Facebook page

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

I fratelli Louis e Temple Abernathy sono ricordati per aver affrontato diversi viaggi "Ocean To Ocean" e in solitaria a partire dal 1909 all’età di 9 e 5 anni. Nel 1911 percorsero a cavallo la tratta New York – San Francisco in 62 giorni, il nuovo record di velocità per l’epoca. La loro storia è stata anche riproposta al cinema.

 

Pseudonimo: Abernathy Boys

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: 1900-?

Riferimento geografico: Stati Uniti

Mezzo di trasporto: A cavallo

Riferimenti complementari: Abernathy A., Bud & me: the true adventures of the Abernathy boys, Dove Creek Press, 1998

ID: w393

Internet: http://budandme.com

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q6686586

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Harry Bensley si lanciò nel viaggio attorno mondo portando una maschera di ferro per scommessa. Conosciuto con il nome “The Man in the Iron Mask” o come “The Masked Walker” aveva quale obbiettivo i 100’000 dollari messi in palio dalla scommessa tra John Pierpoint Morgan e Hugh Cecil Lowther Lonsdale. Partì da Trafalgar Square il 1.o gennaio 1908. Le attestazioni successive sono rare, tanto da lasciare il dubbio sull’effettiva realizzazione del progetto.

 

Pseudonimo: The Man in the Iron Mask; The Masked Walker

Iscrizioni: The man with the iron mask walking round the world for a $21'000 wager

Nazionalità: Inglese

Nascita-morte: 1876-1956

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi con carrozzina

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w1705

Internet: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/making_history/making_history_20071218.shtml

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q5667285

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Isabella Lucy Bird è stata una scrittrice e viaggiatrice inglese attiva nella seconda metà del XIX secolo. Nel 1892 fu la prima donna ad essere ammessa nella Royal Geographical Society.

Life of a Victorian adventuress: Incredible story of clergyman's daughter who braved malaria, floods and wars to trek across China

At a time when few women would leave their houses alone, Isabella Bird braved war, floods and male scorn to complete arduous solo journeys in America and the Far East.

From 1894 to 1897 the Victorian explorer trekked across China while it was with war with Japan, documenting the lives of the men and women she met through detailed written accounts and a collection of vivid photographs.

Some of her incredible journeys, published in her 1899 work in The Yangtze and Beyond, are now the subject of a new book by Deborah Ireland.

'She was the most incredible woman, and a true role model for women today,' Ireland told MailOnline Travel.

'Isabella didn't become famous as a travel writer until she was 44 - at that time women just didn't have careers as writers. And it wasn't until she was 60 that she discovered photography. She broke the mould.'

In her book, Ireland charts Bird's three years spent travelling in China and reprints her stunning photographs of Chinese daily life gradually being infiltrated by European clothing and customs.

Isabella Bird turned to writing as a way to make money for her and her unmarried sister

Born in 1831 the daughter of a clergyman, as Ireland writes: 'The adventuress who travelled and rode in all weathers, exploring remote and dangerous regions, was writing about a life in sharp contrast to the one originally envisaged for her.'

The intrepid Yorkshire woman started writing in 1854 when she travelled to America to mend a broken heart. But it wasn't until 1875 that she found fame with an account of her experiences in Hawaii.

Bird was on her way home from an ill-fated trip to Australia when she fell in love with the islands. She initially wrote extensive accounts of her escapades to her sister, and decided that writing would provide a much-needed income for the unmarried pair.

On her return, Bird embarked on her publishing career and her candid accounts of her travel became instant bes-sellers, and she hasn't been out of print since.

Ireland writes: 'As a respected international traveller her views were sought by prime ministers, ambassadors and the newspaper men of the day.

'Her books were engaging, accessible and entertaining and she opened up a world of travel to the armchair explorer.'

Despite saying she was too old for arduous journeys, Bird travelled 8,000 miles during an extended trip to China, travelling on horseback and in carts, by boat and in a sedan chair, using her newly acquired camera and photographic skills to document her journey.

She traversed the country, from Hangchow (Hangzhou) to Hong Kong and from one end of the River Yangtze to the other as well as venturing into Korea and Japan.

In 1894 she set off from Liverpool to the Far East unaware she was travelling into the First Sino-Japanese War between China and Japan over control of Korea.

She was deported from Korea on a Japanese steamer with no money and luggage and only the clothes on her back and was forced to take refuge in China.

There she experienced a flood on the Manchurian Plain and risked her life helping drowning villagers in terrific storms before succumbing to malaria. She then broke her arm when the cart she was travelling in overturned just miles from the house of the missionary who was to take her in.

Confined to the town of Mukden (Shenyang) by her injuries, she spent time getting to know the missionary doctors and photographing their patients, many of whom suffered from leprosy or the effects of opium addiction.

Her photographs of this time show pagodas and palaces as well as the mean back streets and the ravaged faces of disese sufferers.

While travelling in the Chinese interior she managed to avoid the plagues of rats and other vermin by suspending her clothes and boots on the tripod of her camera.

She adopted Chinese dress as the tight fitting, tailored clothes she was used to were considered offensive by the local population.

However she did not quite escape the curiosity or hostility of the locals who were not used to seeing a foreigner, let alone a foreign woman, travelling.

Ireland writes: 'Overnight halts were a problem because of the stir she created by her arrival. This could range from curiosity to extreme hostility – from holes drilled through the walls of her room followed by whispering and giggling, to a full-blown riot with shouts of "Foreign devil", "Child eater".'

She also received the scorn of her countrymen, with archaeologist Sir Austen Henry Layard writing to her publisher's son: 'I must say I think the woman must be devoid of all delicacy and modesty who could travel as she did, without a female attendant among a crowd of dirty Persian muleteers and others.'

However Bird's account of her travels was hailed by one reviewer at the time as 'one of the most thoroughly documented accounts of late nineteenth century China ever written.'

In response to Sir Austen criticism, Ireland writes: 'Not bad for an account of a journey "undertaken for recreation an interest solely" or "but to satisfy her curiosity and love of travel".'

And what about Bird's legacy? 'Never give up! And don't think you're ever too old to do anything,' Ireland tells us. 'If you want, it's possible to have a new career at 60. She certainly did.'

www.dailymail.co.uk

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Inglese

Nascita-morte: 1831-1904

Riferimento geografico: Asia, Europa, America del Nord, America centrale, America del Sud,

Mezzo di trasporto: Diversi

Riferimenti complementari: Bird I., Isabella Bird, Una lady nel West : tra pionieri, serpenti e banditi sulle Montagne Rocciose, EDT, 1998 Scatamacchia C., Nellie Bly: Un'avventurosa giornalista e viaggiatrice americana dell'Ottocento, Perugia : Morlacchi Editore, 2002

ID: w1714

Internet: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-2999096/How-Victorian-adventuress-Isabella-Bird-braved-wars-survived-malaria-ignored-scorn-countrymen-best-selling-travel-writer-photojournalist.html

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q288210

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Il 5 maggio 1896 Helga Estby partì da Spokane (Washington) in compagnia della figlia Clara con l'obiettivo di raggiungere New York. Vi giunsero a Natale, sperando di incassare i 10'000 dollari messi in palio per premiare la donna che avesse realizzato un coast-to-coast a piedi. Purtroppo Helga non ricevette il denaro che le sarebbe servito per salvare la sua fattoria dal pignoramento.

Norwegian immigrant and suffragist Helga Estby is remembered for her heroic seven-month walk from Spokane to New York City in 1896, a publicity wager that she expected would pay her $10,000 and save the family farm from foreclosure. Leaving a husband and five children at home in Mica Creek, 36-year-old Helga and her 17-year-old daughter Clara set out from Spokane on May 6, 1896, and walked rail lines east. Helga skillfully handled a publicity campaign, stopping at newspaper offices along their route. Inspired by journalist Nelly Bly (1864-1922), Helga hoped one day to publish the story of their trip. Mother and daughter worked for food, lodging, and other needed items along the way -- never begged -- and were graciously aided by supportive and hospitable people, including famous politicians, Native Americans, journalists, and suffragists. But the journey was arduous. They climbed mountains; survived severe storms, floods, bitter cold, and heat waves; confronted wild animals; and escaped highwaymen. Together they wore out 32 pairs of shoes. Helga and Clara survived the trip of 4,600 miles and reached New York City on December 23, 1896, only to find no cash prize at the end of their amazing journey.

Early Years of Hardship

Helga Avilda Ida Marie Johanssen was born in Christiania, Norway (Oslo) in 1860 and was only 2 years old when her father died. Her mother, Karen Hendrikstatter Johanssen, eventually remarried, this time to a merchant with the surname of Haug. He had the money to send Helga to private school, where she learned English, science, and religion.

From 1874 to 1914 Norway suffered from severe economic stagnation, and a large number of its citizens emigrated to other places, with many coming to the United States. Perhaps the Haugs foresaw the pending financial problems -- they decided to move to America around 1870, before the economic turndown began. Helga's stepfather came first and secured work and a home for his wife and stepdaughter in Manistee, Michigan. Karen and Helga left for the U.S. aboard the ship Oder and arrived in Manistee on October 12, 1871. Helga was now 11 years old. She enrolled in school, improved her language skills, and began adapting to the customs of the new country.

Manistee was a thriving town, with a large population of Scandinavians. Although fire destroyed the town the year they arrived, it was quickly rebuilt. It is likely that Helga first learned about the woman suffrage issue while living there. In 1874, Michigan males were given the chance to extend the vote to women. Although the measure failed statewide, it was strongly supported in Manistee.

At 16 years of age, an unmarried Helga became pregnant and her parents arranged for her to marry a solid prospect, Scandinavian immigrant Ole Estby, who was a logger and skilled carpenter. Helga and Ole married on October 12, 1876, and daughter Clara was born in November.

Moving West

In many ways, Helga and Ole's story mirrors the stories of numerous immigrants who came to the United States at the end of the nineteenth century. Arriving with great hopes for a prosperous lifestyle, they mostly labored hard just to make ends meet. From letters Ole sent to his family in Norway, it is known that he had long dreamed of having a 160-acre homestead, and he soon moved his family west, settling on prairie land in Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, near the South Dakota border. Here the family built a typical prairie sod house with a dirt floor, certainly a step down from accommodations they had previously known. Three Estby children were born here: Ole, who died as an infant, Olaf, and Ida. 

Farm life on the prairie was hard. In the summer of 1880 the harvest was excellent, but that winter turned out to be one of the coldest ever recorded. Somehow the family survived. Then fires threatened, and one afternoon the Estbys battled a blaze that nearly reached their home. Both house and barn survived, but some of their neighbors were not so lucky.

Diptheria threatened. Little was known at the time about its cause or cure, but health warnings pointed to the dangers of living in filthy conditions. When a storm known as "Black Friday" (Bold Spirit, p. 40) reached the prairie on June 19, 1885, causing considerable wreckage, followed by another severe storm only a month later, Ole and Helga decided to move on. This time they settled in the rapidly growing city of Spokane Falls, Washington.

Spokane Falls (Spokane)

By the early 1890s, the U.S. economy was booming and Spokane Falls was prospering. Ole found work easily and the Estbys were able to purchase three lots on Pine Street and 4th Avenue, a block east of Division Street. Their family was growing, with the additions of children Henry, Hedwig (Bertha), Johnny, Arthur, William, and Lillian. By the time she was 35, Helga had given birth to eight children, six of whom lived.

Spokane Falls grew too quickly, the population rising from about 6,000 to 20,000 in a few years. City officials could not keep pace with infrastructure needs. Sewage flowed in the streets and the Estby home now was only blocks away from a tough red-light district. On one dark evening, Helga stepped in a hole in an unrepaired street and badly damaged her pelvis, requiring surgery. Once again, it was time to leave. Ole purchased a farm about 25 miles southeast of Spokane, in Mica Creek, a small town populated mainly by Scandinavian immigrants.

But in April of 1893 a national credit shortage triggered a deep economic depression. Banks closed, thousands of businesses went bankrupt, railroads failed, and unemployment was high. No government relief funds existed, and it would take at least five years before the U. S. economy improved.  Ole had suffered back injuries, temporarily limiting his ability to do physical labor. As the economy worsened, they borrowed against the property, taking a loan they could not repay. By 1896 the Estby family was in danger of losing their farm.  

The situation called for unusual courage. Something extraordinary needed to be done and Helga devised a plan. 

The Wager and Preparations

An outspoken supporter of woman suffrage, Helga believed women were capable of doing anything men could do. When an East Coast party -- it was never determined who -- offered a $10,000 wager to a woman who would walk to New York City, Helga was quick to respond. Challenges were not new to her. Inspired by female journalist Nellie Bly, who traveled around the world and wrote about it, Helga contracted with the party (or parties) in New York to walk from Spokane to New York City, a distance of more than 4,000 miles, in a specified time of seven months. While it was not part of the contract and wager, Helga also hoped to publish a book based on the journals she planned to keep of the trip.

The plan must have shocked her family and neighbors. Attitudes toward women were beginning to change, but a woman's place was still considered to be in the home, caring for the family. Helga was not in good health and she was not young. Only the year before, she had given birth and was still recovering from her pelvic injury. But she was convinced that the trip would not only save their farm, it would also boost the suffrage cause, showing the strength and endurance of women. Helga asked her shy, dependable 17-year-old daughter Clara (1877-1950) to accompany her, which must have greatly relieved the family's worries. At least Helga would not be traveling alone.

A contract was drawn between Helga and the sponsoring party promising Helga and Clara $10,000 -- a huge sum of money in 1896 -- if they successfully reached their destination by a specified date. Helga agreed that they would not beg along the way but instead would work for their food, lodging, and clothing. She accurately figured that public awareness would increase as she and Clara spoke with reporters in major cities along the way.

They officially kicked off their departure with a stop at the Spokesman Review in Spokane on May 5 to announce their planned journey and then returned home to spend one last night with their family before leaving the following morning. Spokane's mayor, H. N. Belt (b. 1841), gave them a letter of introduction, which they carried with them. The state treasurer also signed and stamped the letter with the official State seal.

The two women traveled light. In their satchels they carried a compass, a map, a Smith and Wesson revolver, a pepper spray gun to thwart possible attackers, a knife, a notebook and pen, and a curling iron. Helga and Clara had a mother-daughter studio portrait taken in Spokane, which was made into carte de visite prints that they planned to sell as souvenirs. They also carried calling cards that read: "H. Estby and daughter. Pedestrians, Spokane to New York." That, and $5 cash each.

On departure day, Helga and Clara wore long gray dresses and high boots but changed clothes in Salt Lake City, and for the remainder of the trip wore short-skirt outfits designed for the new craze, bicycle riding, thus giving national attention to this new style. Before trip's end, they hand worn out 32 pairs of shoes.  

Along the Way

By the 1890s the railroads ran from coast to coast and portions of the track were still new. To keep "on track," the two women walked rail lines, first the Northern Pacific to the Union Pacific, then the Rock Island line to the Burlington and Reading. This provided them access to some railroad section houses, and citizens often gave them overnight lodging. Such was the code of hospitality in 1896 America. Surprisingly, Helga and Clara spent only nine nights without shelter. To pay for their needs, they cooked, cleaned, and sewed.  Most days they walked 25 to 35 miles and when they arrived in a city or town, their first stop was the local newspaper office, where they gave an updated version of their story to reporters. The trip took them to major cities: Boise, Salt Lake City, Lincoln, Des Moines, Davenport, Chicago, Fort Wayne, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Harrisburg, Reading, and New York City.

Helga and Clara battled snowstorms, heat waves, flash floods, and washed-out bridges. They climbed mountains. Defending herself from a persistent hobo near La Grande, Oregon, Clara shot him in the leg, a story Helga relayed to a reporter at the Minneapolis Tribune. This incident gave rise to their press image as tough, gun-toting women of the Wild West. While facts often varied in newspaper accounts, each reporter found Helga and Clara articulate, well-educated, and intelligent.

By the time they reached Pennsylvania, citizens greeted them as celebrities, amazed that they had come so far. Helga and Clara collected the autographs of many notables along the way, including governors and mayors in Utah, Colorado, Iowa, Chicago, and Pennsylvania; populist General Jacob Coxey (1854-1951); and presidential candidate William McKinley (1843-1901). They also visited the wife of his opponent, William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925). Bryan himself was away campaigning. Clara sprained an ankle in Pennsylvania and Helga wrote to their sponsor requesting a few days extension of time so that Clara's ankle could heal.  

Winning and Losing

Helga and Clara arrived in New York City on Wednesday, December 23, 1896. There they were shocked to learn that they would not receive the $10,000. Yes, they were a few days over the specified time limit, but they had successfully made the trip. The journey had expanded their own worlds and had certainly proven the great endurance of women. They had proven their own capabilities, achieving something even most men would never have tried. Yet they failed to save the farm.

Questions remain. It is possible that the sponsor had no money to offer them and never expected them to succeed, but it is difficult to understand why he or she did not provide them the money to get home. To make matters worse, Helga's written journals disappeared in New York, either misplaced or stolen.

Then Helga and Clara received tragic news from home. Bertha had died of diphtheria and the remaining children were quarantined. Ole and the children were coping with the tragedy alone. To most 1890s Americans, Helga's trip now seemed nothing short of reckless family abandonment and folly.

Now destitute in New York, two days before Christmas, Helga and Clara had to figure out how to get home. This time they would not walk. With the U.S. economy still in a slump, and wages for women so low they could not save any amount from what they earned, they visited both the city of Brooklyn and local charities for help, but were rejected. Clara then approached railroad titan Chauncey Depew (1834-1928) and Depew gave them rail passes to travel from New York to Minneapolis.

Upon arrival in Minneapolis, Helga and Clara met with reporters and Helga stated that she had arranged with her New York sponsor to publish a book based on their journey. Then they would receive the $10,000. The women stayed several days in Minneapolis and then headed home, most likely by rail. It was now the spring of 1897.

Aftermath

Helga and Clara met a grieving family when they returned to Mica Creek. Johnny too had died of diphtheria. No one wanted to hear of their trip. To the family, the memory was bitter and the cost too high.

The expected eventually happened. On March 28, 1901, the Estby farm was sold at a sheriff's sale. But instead of this being the tragedy Helga had imagined, it became a new beginning for the family, who moved back to Spokane where Ole and son Arthur partnered in the construction business and did well. They soon built the family a two-story home. Clara graduated from business college and made a career in the financial world.

Telling the Story

Back in Spokane, Helga supported Washington's successful 1910 woman suffrage campaign and continued to dream of publishing a book about the trip. With the travel journals gone, sometime in the 1920s she began writing from memory.

Arthur Estby died when he was only 39, and his 8-year-old daughter, Thelma Estby (later Bahr), went to live with her grandmother Helga. Thelma remembered Helga as a kindly woman who understood the tragedy of losing a parent. According to Thelma, Helga often kept to herself in an attic room where she painted, did needlework, and wrote. Helga asked Thelma to take care of her story, although Thelma did not know what she meant. Upon Helga's death, one family member burned Helga's writing but another saved two news clippings of the trip from the burn barrel.

In 1984 eighth-grader Doug Bahr was encouraged by his family to enter the Washington State History Day Contest with his essay "Grandma Walked from Coast to Coast." One of the contest judges that year was author and scholar Linda Lawrence Hunt, who was inspired to research more. This led to her writing "A Victorian Odyssey," published in the Summer 1995 issue of Columbia Magazine. She then developed the material into the book Bold Spirit: Helga Estby's Forgotten Walk Across Victorian America, published by Anchor Books in 2005. Folk singer and songwriter Linda Allen composed the song "Helga Estby," which she included in a CD of songs celebrating the 100th anniversary of Washington woman suffrage in 2010.

April 2011 saw the release of two young adult novels. The Year We Were Famous, intended for readers 12 and up, was written by Helga's great-granddaughter and retired Everett Public Library librarian Carole Estby Dagg and published by Clarion Books. Following a day later was a Waterbrook Press book, The Daughter's Walk, authored by Jane Kirkpatrick. All three books are well-researched and well-written. Dagg is following with a sequel that will cover Helga and Clara's year of 1897. It is noteworthy that the two novels use Clara as the main character.

Helga looks contented in portraits taken of her in her elder years. The journey had given her confidence and expanded her world. The trip was life-changing. Perhaps Clara suffered the most. Although she made a career for herself, she separated from the family, uniting with them only during the last years of her life. Their story will never be told in their own words, which is a great loss. Helga's perspective would have been a unique piece of travel writing, giving a priceless feminine perspective on the United States in 1896. Across the years, the story continues to intrigue.

http://www.historylink.org/File/9926

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: 1860-1942

Riferimento geografico: Stati Uniti

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: Hunt L., Bold Spirit : Helga Estby's Forgotten Walk Across Victorian America , University of Idaho Press, 2003 Estby Dagg, The Year We Were Famous, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt , 2011

ID: w1922

Internet: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helga_Estby

Wikidata: -

Write comment (1 Comment)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Nellie Bly iniziò a lavorare come giornalista al Pittsburgh Dispatch, prendendo lo pseudonimo dal nome di un personaggio della famosa canzone di Stephen Foster. Trasferitasi a New York, proseguì la sua carriera giornalistica al New York World di Joseph Pulitzer. Nel 1888, Bly suggerì al proprio editore l'idea di tradurre in realtà la finzione descritta nel libro Il giro del mondo in 80 giorni.

Il 14 novembre 1889 , alle 9:40, Nellie Bly partì da New York per intraprendere il viaggio intorno al mondo, riproponendo l'idea di Jules Verne. La reporter percorse 24'899 miglia in settantadue giorni, sei ore, undici minuti e quattordici secondi, rentrando a New York il 25 gennaio 1890 e fissando il nuovo record di circumnavigazione. Il primato durò pochi mesi, migliorato successivamente da George Francis Train, che completò il viaggio in sessantasette giorni.

Elizabeth Jane Cochran, pur non essendo la prima donna in assoluto a compiere tale impresa, fu la prima a farlo con queste modalità, diventando una sorta di modello per le donne in cerca d'emancipazione.

A questo proposito va notato che così come Bly non fu la prima donna americana a diventare reporter, ella non fu neanche la prima donna a fare il giro del mondo da sola; ma in entrambi i casi introdusse in tali ambiti delle novità che ne trasformarono le precedenti modalità e resero unica la sua esperienza. Nel caso del viaggio intorno al mondo, Bly fu la prima donna a fare una corsa contro il tempo che, combinando il tema della velocità - legato al progresso tecnico - con quello della trasgressione, risultò particolarmente attraente agli occhi del pubblico americano; inoltre la grande pubblicità data all'evento dal quotidiano che lo sponsorizzava contribuì al successo strepitoso dell'impresa. (Scatamacchia, 2002)

Pseudonimo: Nellie Bly; Pink; Cochrane

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: 1864-1922

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: Diversi

Riferimenti complementari: Scatamacchia C., Nellie Bly: Un'avventurosa giornalista e viaggiatrice americana dell'Ottocento, Perugia : Morlacchi Editore, 2002 Wong E., Around the World and Across the Board: Nellie Bly and the Geography of Games, American Studies Department, Rutgers University, 2005

ID: w1803

Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nellie_Bly

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q230299

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Stefano Bolliger e Angelina Perrin sono partiti partiti nel 2007 in bicicletta da Lugano alla volta dell’India.

Giro del mondo in bici: partiti!
Angelina e Stefano hanno iniziato il loro viaggio in bicicletta, che li vedrà percorrere la Via della Seta.
Sono partiti. Sono montati in sella alla loro bicicletta e hanno iniziato il loro percorso che li porterà a visitare diversi paesi, fino ad arrivare in India.

Angelina Perrin e Stefano Bolliger sono partiti poco fa da Pazzallo, per questo singolare e suggestivo viaggio in bicicletta.

In un anno, come già vi abbiamo spiegato ieri, la coppia di giovani attraverserà l'Italia, la Grecia, la Turchia, la Siria, la Giordania, l'Egitto, l'Uzbekistan, l'Iran, la Cina, il Pakistan, fino ad arrivare in India.

Vi ricordiamo che il loro viaggio sarà monitorabile da metà settembre sul sito Internet http://sionroulait.blogs.marieclaire.fr.

http://www.tio.ch/News/Ticino/341712/Giro-del-mondo-in-bici-partiti/


Ils s'en vont pour 14 mois... à bicyclette !

Une jeune vendéenne et son compagnon sont partis hier de Suisse pour rejoindre l'Inde... à vélo. Objectif  : la défense de ce mode de transport propre.
Quatorze mois de vélo, de Suisse jusqu'en Inde ! C'est le projet un peu fou de la Vendéenne Angélina Perrin et de son compagnon Stéphane Bolliger. Dimanche, c'était le jour du grand départ : « Ça nous trottait dans la tête depuis plus de deux ans, raconte Angélina. Au début, c'était un simple rêve. Puis un jour, on s'est mis à y réfléchir plus précisément. On a regardé des cartes, imaginé l'itinéraire. C'est là qu'on s'est dit qu'il fallait vraiment qu'on le fasse. »

Le moteur de l'aventure · Promouvoir l'usage du vélo comme mode de transport alternatif et écologique, autant au quotidien qu'en vacances. « Le vélo fait partie de notre vie de tous les jours. Moi, j'habite désormais Paris, explique la Vendéenne. Je fais 26 km de vélo chaque jour, pour aller et revenir du travail. Sur un deux-roues, tout est plus pratique, on se sent libre. On profite mieux de la ville et on se sent en meilleure forme physique. Et puis c'est gratuit. »

Cette aventure, Angélina et Stéphane y ont déjà un peu goûté. Voilà des années que ces baroudeurs louent des deux-roues lors de leurs voyages à l'étranger. Au Maroc, à Bali, au Mexique... « C'était fabuleux ! On ne nous regardait pas comme des touristes sortant d'un bus ou d'un gros 4*4. Alors, on nous accueillait à bras ouverts. C'était fort de rencontres. »

L'été dernier, ils ont fait un galop d'essai : 600 km de Lugano, en Suisse, jusqu'à Venise : « Voyager ainsi change tout : on échappe aux voitures, on contemple des paysages fabuleux. Et quand on arrive à destination, on est contents, on l'a vraiment méritée cette destination de rêve ! Notre état d'esprit de vacanciers s'en trouve complètement bouleversé. »

« Pas des masochistes »

Angélina Perrin n'a pas hésité à vendre son appartement et prendre un congé sans solde pour que le rêve de son couple prenne corps. Tente de camping, réchaud et filtre à eau dans leur besace, ils prennent la route ce matin. Départ de Lugano, en Suisse, pour l'Italie puis la Grèce via un ferry. Puis viendront les Cyclades, la Turquie, la Syrie, la Jordanie... Jusqu'en Iran et la Route de la Soie. Cap vers l'Inde.

« Ce n'est pas un voyage de masochiste que nous entreprenons ! Nous ne sommes pas des têtes brûlées qui souhaitent braver tous les dangers. Non, nous voulons simplement montrer que si nous parvenons à le faire, c'est qu'il est possible pour beaucoup de monter sur un deux-roues. Au moins au quotidien. Et pourquoi pas faire Nantes-Bordeaux à vélo pour les vacances ? Stéphane et moi, on a convaincu des amis. Ils l'ont fait. Ils sont conquis ! »

http://www.larochesuryon.maville.com/actu/actudet_-ils-s-en-vont-pour-14-mois...-a-bicyclette-_15-432077_actu.Htm

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Svizzera

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Asia, Europa

Mezzo di trasporto: Bicicletta, monociclo, triciclo

Riferimenti complementari: Bolliger S., Perrin A., Sulla Via della Seta, La Città, luglio 2008

ID: w1723

Internet: -

Wikidata: -

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Ffyona Campbell è stata la prima donna a percorrere ufficialmente il giro del mondo a piedi. Ha camminato per 32'000 chilometri (20'000 miglia) impiegando 11 anni.

 Starting from John O'Groats on the northernmost coast of Scotland in 1983, 16-year-old Ffyona Campbell set out on an epic walk that would take her around the world. Eleven years and 19,586 miles later, she returned to the starting point, having raised £120,000 for charity. Ffyona raised half this amount in one go by selling the advertising space on her forehead to Vaseline during her well-publicised return. Her great feat should have led the British press to hail the determined athlete a heroine. She had crossed four continents (Australasia, Europe, Africa and North America), walked through war zones and barely escaped numerous attacks. But Ffyona Campbell is remembered for cheating during her marathon. During her walk across the USA, when she was 18 years old, Campbell became pregnant by one of her support team, Brian Noel. It grew increasingly difficult to maintain the distances she had been walking daily. Tired and depressed, she decided to accept Noel's offer of lifts in between cities to help her meet appointments with sponsors. Four months later, after 1,000 miles of deception, Campbell had her pregnancy terminated and resumed walking. On her return to Britain, she received a mixed reception; the press criticised her self-obsessed nature while John Major praised her as a role model. Consumed by guilt about the miles that she had skipped, Campbell turned to heroin and came close to suicide before she decided to confess in autumn 1996. She returned to America to complete her journey and asked that her achievement be removed from the next copy of the Guinness Book of World Records. Her request was rightfully refused as even without the 1,000 miles she had easily broken the record. Understandably, Ffyona has since kept a low profile - though we can reveal that she has become an art student. New Statesman, Gone, and (almost) completely forgotten, 22.07.2002

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Scozzese

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: Campbell F., Whole Story a Walk Around the World, Firebird Distributing, 1997

ID: w1764

Internet: http://ftvdb.bfi.org.uk/sift/title/515635

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q1937511

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Charley Boorman e Ewan McGregor sono i simpatici protagonisti di una doppia serie televisiva trasmessa nel Regno Unito da Sky.

La prima serie, realizzata nel 2004, è intitolata Long Way Round e narra le peripezie dei due motociclisti e della loro troupe lungo il tragitto Londra - New York. Nella seconda serie, intitolata Long Way Down, i due amici si ritrovano per un viaggio che li porta dal punto più a nord della Scozia fino a Capo Agulhas, in Sud Africa.

Da allora, Boorman ha prodotto numerose altre serie dedicate ai viaggi.

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Scozzese

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Africa, America del Nord, Asia, Europa, Russia,

Mezzo di trasporto: Motocicletta, motorino

Riferimenti complementari: McGregor, Ewan, Charley Boorman, and Robert Uhlig. Long Way Round: Chasing Shadows Across the World. New York: Atria Books, 2004.

ID: w1726

Internet: www.longwayround.com 

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q724867

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

I fratelli Louis e Temple Abernathy sono ricordati per aver affrontato diversi viaggi "Ocean To Ocean" e in solitaria a partire dal 1909 all’età di 9 e 5 anni. Nel 1911 percorsero a cavallo la tratta New York – San Francisco in 62 giorni, il nuovo record di velocità per l’epoca. La loro storia è stata anche riproposta al cinema.

 

Pseudonimo: Abernathy Boys

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: 1904-1986

Riferimento geografico: Stati Uniti

Mezzo di trasporto: A cavallo

Riferimenti complementari: Abernathy A., Bud & me: the true adventures of the Abernathy boys, Dove Creek Press, 1998

ID: w394

Internet: http://budandme.com

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q6686586

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Il 4 maggio 1930 Marcel Bardiaux partì dalla Francia per raggiungere Costantinopoli con la sua canoa chiamata "Belle Etoile". Percorse complessivamente 13'000 km, pubblicando durante il viaggio una decina di resoconti sulla rivista "Camping". Il 10 marzo 1931 anche il Paris Match dedica un servizio al suo periplo, in particolare al viaggio di rientro.

La fin de la croisière de la "Belle Etoile"

Nous avons raconté comment ce jeune navigateur, parti des bords de la Marne le 4 mai dernier sur son canoé, était arrivé, après de nombreuses aventures à Constantinople. Empruntant canaux, fleuves, -roulant parfois son canoé sur les routes, visitant Vienne, Budapest, Belgrade, arrivant à la mer Noire le 23 août, essuyant une tempête le long des côtes rocheuses de la Bulgarie, il arrive enfin à Constantinople: Son projet initial comportait un retour par mer. Marcel Bardiaux vient de rentrer à Paris. Il a résumé ici pour nos lecteurs le récit de son retour mouvementé. Ayant enfin réussi à gagner Constantinople où je fus admirablement reçu à bord du Théophile-Gautier, par la mer de Marmara et les Dardanelles j'atteignis les côtes de Grèce. Je passe ainsi Alexandropolis et Cavala sans malheurs, mais casse de nouveau mon canoé en doublant le mont Athos, où la mer est toujours très mauvaise. J'ai beaucoup de peine à gagner Salonique où je suis obligé de m'arrêter trois semaines pour remettre la Belle Etoile en état de poursuivre son long voyage. Le 22 octobre, je poursuis mon voyage sur le Pirée que j'atteins le 11 novembre après une traversée très mouvementée. J'allai visiter Athènes, et à mon retour je reçus de très mauvaises nouvelles sur l'état de la mer, par les officiers de l'Angkor (paquebot des Messageries Maritimes comme le Théophile-Gautier) qui me déconseillèrent vivement la traversée de l'Adriatique en cette saison avec une telle embarcation. Le commandant me proposa même de me prendre à bord et de me débarquer à Naples, première escale de l'Angkor. Je me laissai tenter, et pour la première fois depuis le début du voyage, la Belle Etoile navigua sans aucun danger sur une mer courroucée... Mais à Naples, où je débarque le 18 novembre, la douane n'est pas très aimable,surtout envers les Français, et malgré toutes mes tentatives de conciliation, je n'arrive pas à m'entendre avec elle. Les conditions de débarquement ne sont vraiment pas acceptables: soit payer les frais de douane, qui sont exorbitants, soit laisser bateau et bagages à la douane pendant mon séjour en Italie. La rage au coeur, sur les conseils du commandant, je me rembarque sur l'Angkor qui me dépose deux jours plus tard à Marseille. Après de touchants adieux, je reprends mon voyage interrompu, à bord de mon canoé. Contre un fort vent debout, je gagne Sète, puis par le canal du Midi atteins Toulouse, après avoir passé une centaine d'écluses! Là, je fais le portage sur la Garonne, beaucoup plus pittoresque et combien moins monotone que le canal, et en quatre étapes j'arrive à Bordeaux. A ce moment, je reçois une lettre de ma famille m'annonçant le mois de mars comme date de mon incorporation militaire. Et, consultant mes cartes, je suis obligé de me rendre à l'évidence; il m'est absolument impossible de rentrer par les côtes de l'Atlantique et de la Manche, puis par la Seine jusqu'à Paris, en si peu de temps, surtout en cette saison où il faut compter avec les tempêtes. Et voici comment je rentrai à Paris par mes seuls moyens: descendant la Gironde jusqu'à Blaye, je renouvelle ma performance d'Allemagne en traînant mon canoé sur son chariot jusqu'à Orléans. La route est bonne heureusement, mais non dépourvue de côtes, surtout aux environs de Limoges. Après trois jours de repos, j'embarque sur le canal d'Orléans (avec les indispensables écluses) qui, à Montargis, me conduit dans celui du Loing. Aucun danger sur ce paisible canal, mais je passe les trois derniers jours sous la neige et le gel, et je campe toujours. A Saint-Mammès, la Seine en crue me transporte à Juvisy en moins d'une journée. J'y arrive le dimanche 8 novembre et débarque à la Société Nautique de la Haute-Seine à Draveil où je gare mon canoé, pendant mon séjour dans ma famille habitant tout près d'ici. Je veux mettre mes notes de voyage au point avant d'arriver à Paris, et avancer mon livre qui paraîtra prochainement sous le titre : Un grand voyage sur un petit bateau. Je suis rentré à Paris le 1er mars à bord de la Belle-Etoile et j'ai accosté près du Pont-Neuf où j'ai eu la joie de recevoir l'accueil fraternel de quelques amis et de la presse sportive.

Marcel Bardiaux

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: Marcel Bardiaux sur son Canoë "Belle Etoile" - 13.000 km à travers l'Europe dont 8.000 en mer

Nazionalità: Francese

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Europa

Mezzo di trasporto: Canoa o kayak

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w1678

Internet: -

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q3288639

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Mark “Monty” Beaumont era un ragazzino amante dello sport con il gusto dell’avventura. A 15 anni percorse il Regno Unito in bicicletta, 1’670km tra Lands End e John O’Groats. Quando Monty viene a sapere che Steven Strange ha concluso il giro del mondo in bicicletta in 276 giorni, 19 ore e 15 minuti, decide di lanciarsi nella sfida. La partenza della folle corsa avviene il 5 agosto 2007 da Parigi, dove farà ritorno 194 giorni e 17 ore dopo, stabilendo il nuovo primato. L’avventura è stata trasmessa dalla BBC nel programma The Man who Cycled the World.

 

Pseudonimo: Monty

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Inglese

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: Bicicletta, monociclo, triciclo

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w1694

Internet: http://www.markbeaumontonline.com

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q1165388

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Viaggiatore appassionato, Tito Barbini vanta numerosi viaggi e altrettante pubblicazioni. Tra le più significative, "Le nuvole chiedono permesso" che ripercorre un viaggio dalla Patagonia all'Alaska realizzato a piedi e con la corriera.

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Italiana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: Diversi

Riferimenti complementari: Barbini T., Le nuvole chiedono permesso : dalla Patagonia all’Alaska cento giorni a piedi e in corriera, Polistampa, 2007

ID: w1677

Internet: http://lenuvolenonchiedonopermesso.blogspot.com

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q22069313

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Viaggio in camper di una famiglia australiana.

John Ahern had it all: a high-flying job, big house, loving wife and two great kids. But if this was success why did he sense he was failing as a husband and father? So John does something completely insane. In the midst of a high-powered board meeting he blows his career apart. He quits the working world, sells the car, rents the house, and with wife Mandy, buys a busted-up old campervan online with one grand goal in mind: a year travelling together as a family…on the road with kids. Disconnected from phones and email, John and his family criss-cross 30 countries on a funny, messy and often confronting voyage of self-discovery. From the North Pole to Africa’s highest peaks, they get mugged by monkeys, charmed by snake handlers and harlots, and inspired by their fellow wanderers. Along the way John sheds the skin of the working zombie and creates a life less ordinary as he evolves into a connected partner and Dad. On the Road with Kids is a hilarious and poignant adventure all families will connect with. It’s a life-changing trip. Take it!

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Australiana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Europa, Africa

Mezzo di trasporto: Automobile o altri mezzi a motore

Riferimenti complementari: John Ahern, On the road with kids, Paperback, 2014

ID: w395

Internet:-

Wikidata: -

Write comment (0 Comments)

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

I due fratelli partirono nel 1936 da Port Elisabeth, in Sud Africa, e giunsero a Londra l'anno dopo. Il viaggio in bicicletta, improvvisato, permise loro di evitare il servizio di leva. Partirono così senza soldi e con mezzi di fortuna per avventurarsi in piste e in rare strade, percorrendo 11'000 km. Scrissero un diario che narra la loro esperienza, intitolato The Road to London.

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Sud-africana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Africa, Europa

Mezzo di trasporto: Bicicletta, monociclo, triciclo

Riferimenti complementari: Attwell Eric, The road to London, Palladian Press, 1997.

ID: w1664

Internet: -

Wikidata: 1286

Write comment (0 Comments)

Page 1 of 56

Donate

This documentation is at your disposal for free. Please consider supporting our efforts, if you wish to thank us, offer us a beer.



Submit link

Suggerisci collegamento - Soumettre un lien - Link melden

Loading, please wait..

Submit globetrotter's name

Loading, please wait..

Please publish modules in offcanvas position.

Free Joomla! template by L.THEME