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Negli anni Trenta del Novecento Fred Birchmore intraprese il giro del mondo in bicicletta, percorrendo circa 25'000 miglia. Le vicende legate al suo viaggio sono narrate nel libro "Around the world on a bicycle". Fred chiamò la sua bicicletta "Bucephalus", bucefalo, riprendendo il nome del cavallo di Alessandro Magno. Nel 1939 percorse la strada tra Atene e New York (12'000 miglia) con la bicicletta "Pegasus". I due mezzi sono entrati a far parte della collezione del Smithsonian Institute.

Fred Birchmore’s Amazing Bicycle Trip Around the World. The American cyclist crossed paths with Sonja Henje and Adolf Hitler as he transversed the globe on Bucephalus, his trusty bike

Fred Birchmore of Athens, Georgia, belongs to an exclusive club: he’s a round-the-world cyclist. The club’s charter member, Thomas Stevens, pedaled his high-wheeler some 15,000 miles across North America, Europe and Asia between 1884 and 1887. Mark Beaumont of Scotland set the current world record in 2007-08, covering almost 18,300 miles in 194 days and 17 hours.

Birchmore finished his epic two-year, 25,000-mile crossing of Eurasia 75 years ago this October. (North America came later.) And unlike the American Frank Lenz, who became famous after he disappeared in Turkey while trying to top Stevens’ feat in 1894, Birchmore lived to tell of his journey. He will turn 100 on November 29.

Birchmore got his first look at Europe from a bicycle seat in the summer of 1935, shortly after he earned a law degree from the University of Georgia. He was on his way to the University of Cologne to study international law when he stopped in central Germany and bought a bicycle: a one-speed, 42-pound Reinhardt. (It is in the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History.) He named it Bucephalus, after Alexander the Great’s horse. Before his classes started, he toured northern Europe with a German friend and Italy, France and Britain by himself.

“I had some wonderful experiences that had nothing to do with the bicycle,” Birchmore recalled in a recent interview at Happy Hollow, his Athens home, which he shares with his wife of 72 years, Willa Deane Birchmore. He cited his climb up the Matterhorn, his swim in the Blue Grotto off Capri, and his brush with the Norwegian Olympic skater and future Hollywood actress Sonja Henie. “I just happened to ice skate on the same lake where she practiced,” he said. “Well, I never had skated. I figured, ‘I’m going to break my neck.’ She came over and gave me a few pointers. Beautiful girl.”

Back in Cologne, he attended a student rally—and came face to face with Adolf Hitler. Working up the crowd, Hitler demanded to know if any Americans were present; Birchmore’s friends pushed him forward. “He nearly hit me in the eye with his ‘Heil, Hitler,’ ” the cyclist recalled. “I thought, ‘Why you little.…’ He was wild-eyed, made himself believe he was a gift from the gods.” But Birchmore kept his cool. “I looked over and there were about 25 or 30 brown-shirted guys with bayonets stuck on the end of their rifles. He gave a little speech and tried to convert me then and there.” The Führer failed.

Although he enjoyed a comfortable life as the guest of a prominent local family, Birchmore was increasingly disturbed by Nazi Germany. From his bicycle, he saw firsthand the signs of a growing militarism. “I was constantly passing soldiers, tanks, giant air fleets and artillery,” he wrote in his memoir, Around the World on a Bicycle.

In February 1936, after completing his first semester, Birchmore cycled through Yugoslavia and Greece and sailed to Cairo. After he reached Suez that March, disaster struck: while he slept on a beach, thieves made off with his cash and passport. Birchmore had to sell off some of his few possessions to pay for a third-class train ticket back to Cairo. On board, he marveled at how “great reservoirs of kindness lay hidden even in the hearts of the poorest,” he wrote. “When word passed around that I was not really one of those brain-cracked millionaires, ‘roughing it’ for the novelty, but broke like them, I was immediately showered with sincere sympathies and offers of material gifts.”


Six weeks passed before he received a new passport. He had already missed the start of the new semester. Having little incentive to return to Cologne, he decided to keep going east as far as his bike would take him. He set off for Damascus and then on to Baghdad, crossing the scorching Syrian desert in six days.

By the time he reached Tehran, he was in a bad way. An American missionary, William Miller, was shocked to find the young cyclist at the mission’s hospital, a gigantic boil on his leg. “He had lived on chocolate and had eaten no proper food so as not to make his load too heavy,” Miller marveled in his memoir, My Persian Pilgrimage. “I brought him to my house. What luxury it was to him to be able to sleep in a bed again! And when we gave him some spinach for dinner he said it was the most delicious food he had ever tasted. To the children of the mission, Fred was a great hero.”

In Afghanistan Birchmore traversed 500 rugged miles, from Herat to Bamian to Kabul, on a course largely of his own charting. Once he had to track down a village blacksmith to repair a broken pedal. “Occasionally, he passed caravans of city merchants, guarded front and rear by armed soldiers,” National Geographic would report. “Signs of automobile tire treads in the sands mystified him, until he observed that many of the shoes were soled with pieces of old rubber tires.”

While traveling along the Grand Trunk Road in India, Birchmore was struck by the number of 100-year-olds he encountered. “No wonder Indians who escape cholera and tuberculosis live so long,” he wrote. “They eat sparingly only twice a day and average fifteen hours of sleep.” (He added: “Americans eat too much, sleep too little, work too hard, and travel too fast to live to a ripe old age.”)

Birchmore’s travails culminated that summer in the dense jungles of Southeast Asia, where he tangled with tigers and cobras and came away with a hide from each species. But a mosquito got the better of him: after collapsing in the jungle, he awoke to find himself abed with a malarial fever in a Catholic missionary hospital in the village of Moglin, Burma.

After riding through Thailand and Vietnam, Birchman boarded on a rice boat to Manila with Bucephalus in tow. In early September, he set sail for San Pedro, California, aboard the SS Hanover. He expected to cycle the 3,000 miles back home to Athens, but he found his anxious parents on the dock to greet him. He and Bucephalus returned to Georgia in the family station wagon.

Nevertheless, Birchmore looked back on his trip with supreme satisfaction, feeling enriched by his exposure to so many people and lands. “Surely one can love his own country without becoming hopelessly lost in an all-consuming flame of narrow-minded nationalism,” he wrote.

Still restless, Birchmore had a hard time concentrating on legal matters. In 1939, he took a 12,000-mile bicycle tour around North America with a pal. He married Willa Deane later that year, and they honeymooned aboard a tandem bike, covering 4,500 miles in Latin America. After serving as a Navy gunner in World War II, he opened a real estate agency. He and Willa Deane raised four children, and he immersed himself in community affairs.

After he retired, in 1973, he embarked on a 4,000-mile bicycle ride through Europe with Danny, the youngest of his children. Two years later, they hiked the 2,000 miles of the Appalachian Trail. While in his 70s, he hand-built a massive stone wall around Happy Hollow. He cycled into his 90s, and he still rides a stationary bike at the local Y. A few years ago, he told a journalist, “For me, the great purposes in life are to have as many adventures as possible, to brighten the lives of as many as possible, and to leave this old world a little bit better place.”

www.smithsonianmag.com

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: Bicicletta, monociclo, triciclo

Riferimenti complementari: Birchmore F. A., Around the world on a bicycle, Cucumber Island Storytellers, 1996

ID: w1713

Internet: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/fred-birchmores-amazing-bicycle-trip-around-the-world-1462409/

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Nell'aprile del 2004, Barbara Egbert, Gary Chambers e la figlia di 10 anni Mary iniziano il viaggio di 6 mesi lungo il Pacific Crest Trail. Si tratta di un sentiero di 2'650 miglia che attraversa gli Stati Uniti collegando il Canada al Messico.

In April 2004, Barbara Egbert and Gary Chambers began a six-month journey to hike the length of the Pacific Crest Trail with their precocious 10-year-old daughter, Mary. That October, Mary became the youngest person ever to successfully walk the 2,650-mile route from Mexico to Canada.

Zero Days is the tale of a family adventure that required love, perseverance, and the careful rationing of toilet paper. The trio, who adopted the trail names Captain Bligh (Gary), Nellie Bly (Barbara), and Scrambler (Mary), hiked for 168 days and took a total of nine “zero days”—days off from hiking, so-called because the backpacker travels zero mileage on the trail itself that day. In addition to weaving an engaging narrative, Barbara incorporates actual pages and drawing from 10-year-old Mary’s journal.

Along the way, they weathered the heat of the Mojave, the jagged peaks of the Sierra, the rain of Oregon (and paradoxically the lack of water sources there), and the final long, cold stretch of the Northern Cascades to Canada. They met trail angels like the Dinsmores and their salty-mouthed parrot, Topper. And they discovered which family values, from love and equality to thrift and cleanliness, could withstand shin splints, an abscessed tooth, aching legs, failing knees, bad water—and a long, narrow trail and 137 nights together in a 6-by-8-foot tent.

https://www.wildernesspress.com/product.php?productid=16511

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Pacific Crest Trail

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: Egbert B., Zero Days: The Real Life Adventure of Captain Bligh, Nellie Bly, and 10-Year-Old Scrambler on the Pacific Crest Trail, Wilderness Press, 2007

ID: w1779

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Camminata di 1200 miglia fino a San Francisco nel 1915.

 

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Iscrizioni: Aitchley walking 1200 (?) miles will meet you in Frisco in 1915

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Stati Uniti

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi con carretto

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w397

Internet: -

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Viaggio dall'Alaska alla Terra del Fuoco: 254'000 chilometri in vespa. L'autore ha continuato a viaggiare in vespa da Roma a Saigon.

La notizia arrivata dal Sud della Cina ha colpito improvvisamente tutto il grande "popolo dei viaggiatori": il 16 settembre ci ha lasciati Giorgio Bettinelli, vinto da un'infezione sulle rive del Mekong. Giorgio, meglio conosciuto come lo Scrittore-in-Vespa e spesso affettuosamente soprannominato "Vespista per Caso" era forse uno degli ultimi grandi avventurieri-esploratori esistenti, quelli che - per intenderci - fanno del viaggio la missione della propria vita e trovano realizzazione nell'incontro con altri popoli, culture e luoghi. Tra i suoi memorabili viaggi in Vespa iniziati per gioco nel 1992, ricordiamo le traversate dall'Alaska alla Terra del Fuoco, da Melbourne a Città del Capo e poi dal Cile alla Tasmania, attraverso Americhe, Siberia, Europa, Africa, Asia e Oceania. Sempre su due ruote, fino all'ultima grande impresa in cui ha toccato per la prima volta tutte le 33 regioni dell'immensa regione cinese.

Giorgio non era "solo" un viaggiatore, ma anche un bravo giornalista e scrittore, capace di accompagnare ogni sua avventura da racconti vividi e appassionanti, diari on the road pubblicati da Feltrinelli, da riviste specializzate, oppure semplicemente sul suo blog personale. Storie che spesso sembrano di fantasia, tra gomme bucate nei momenti meno indicati, passaggi dati a personaggi strambi, panorami colti con il vento in faccia tra la polvere sollevata dalla Vespa, persino rapimenti, come quella volta in Congo in cui...

...La verità è che Giorgio, come tutti i veri avventurieri, sembrava inattaccabile, a dispetto di ogni ostacolo. Questo rende la notizia della sua scomparsa ancora più dolorosa, accompagnata dalle parole della moglie Yapei:

Sono triste, desolata ma Giorgio non è più con noi, vola libero come un uccello, è in viaggio, ma in un altro mondo, freddo.

Giorgio voleva scrivere un libro sul Tibet, ma non può più farlo, ora ha bisogno di dormire.

Non so cosa posso fare per continuare il suo sogno, alle sue parole e al suo amore verso di noi.

www.turistipercaso.it

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Italiana

Nascita-morte: 1955-2008

Riferimento geografico: America del Nord, Asia

Mezzo di trasporto: Motocicletta, motorino

Riferimenti complementari: Bettinelli G., In Vespa, Da Roma a Saigon, Milano: Feltrinelli, 2003

ID: w1710

Internet: -

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q3765290

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Nelson Bradt partì da New York il 9 aprile 1891 per un coast-to-coast di 2'500 miglia con destinazione San Francisco, dove giunse il 4 luglio. Un articolo del San Francisco Morning Call, pubblicato il 5 luglio 1891, ripercorre le tappe salienti della sua avventura.

Yesterday as the grand military and civic parade was disbanding a lone cyclist arrived from New York, fresh and hearty to all appearances, after a ride which from start to finish, lacked but a few days of filling three months of his history. The wheelman was Nelson A. Bradt. He made the trip partly for pleasure and partly for business, is connection with the Eastern press offering him opportunities for correspondence, of which he availed himself largely on his transcontinental ride. He was favored with fair weather from first to last, and his journey was made particularly pleasant by the friendliness of the wheelmen's clubs en route. Mr. Bradt left New York on April 9th, and traveled by way of Buffalo, Chicago, Kansas City, Topeka, Denver, Salt Lake, Ogden, and Sacramento. He completed the first stage of his journey, Chicago (980 miles) in ten days. Resting there for six days he resumed his journey on April 25th and pushed his way by Quincy, Ill., to Kansas City, where he arrived nine days later. He spent four days at this place and on May 8th made a fresh start via Topeka over the prairie to Denver, riding through five inches of snow on the way when about twenty or thirty miles east of Colorado Springs. He put up at Denver on the 23rd of May, and next morning pushed forward for Leadville. It took him eight days of hard work to cross the mountains, which, besides being very steep, were covered with a thick mantel of snow, and then another eight days were spent in the saddle before he gave his wheel a rest in Salt Lake. This was the most trying portion of his trip, as he had to sleep outdoors during all of the sixteen days. On June 4, after a five days' rest, Mr. Bradt bade good-bye to Salt Lake. He reached Ogden next day and was there stricken down with fever and ague. Recovering after a nine days' siege he set out again on June 24th, crossed the Sierras, dropped down by Sacramento into the land of gold and climate and pursued his course without stop to the Golden Gate. (He reached San Francisco July 4th) The venturesome wheelman's outfit consisted of a full riding suit, one extra suit, shirts, collars and toilet necessaries, pair of revolvers, fishing-tackle and blankets - weighing in all about twenty pounds. He stopped at every likely stream and fished with plenty of success. On very warm days he rested during the midday and pushed forward at night. On January 1 (1891), instead of resolving to turn over a new leaf, as many young men do, Mr. Bradt determined to make a 10,000-mile record with his bicycle during the year. Between New Year's and his start on his present trip his cyclometer registered 2485 miles, to which he has just added 4420 miles in his meandering across the continent, a total of 6904 miles so far. Based on this account it appears that Mr. Bradt was a very fast rider who averaged over 71 miles per day on the 62 days of the 86-day trip that he was in the saddle. Some Wheelmen of the era, however, viewed his time/mileage claims with suspicion. It seems that he was not trying to set a new record for the crossing or he would not have tarried in Chicago, Kansas City, and Salt Lake City, devoted time to fishing, or take a circuitous route. He was interested in mileage that would help him reach his goal of a 10,000-mile year.

 

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Iscrizioni: Another transcontinental tour on the Eagle. Nelson A. Bradt finishes his trip to San Francisco on his Eagle. Riding days, 62; distance travelled, 4420 miles; average, 71 1.5 miles per day.

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Stati Uniti

Mezzo di trasporto: Velocipede

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w1734

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Nel 1890 Thomas Gaskell Allen, accompagnato da William Sachtleben, intrapresero il giro del mondo utilizzando una bicicletta. Rientrarono nel 1893 con alle spalle 15'000 miglia, all'epoca il viaggio continuo più lungo mai effettuato. Raccolsero le avventure avute in Oriente nel volume "Across Asia on a bicycle".

Foreword

The boldness and courage that Thomas Allen and William Sachtleben display in this book is impressive. On June 14, 1890, just one day after they graduated from Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri, they set out on a record -breaking journey around the world. As they put it, they did it hoping to add practical experience to the book knowledge they had acquired in college. As they traveled, they hoped to meet the people of the world face-to-face, unhindered by protective tour guides and luxurious accomodations. That's why in this book you will see them constantly scheming to escape the zaptiehs (guards) that local leaders force upon them. It's also why they endure, with only modest complain, such utterly horrible living conditions. As their primary means of travel they chose the then-new "safety bicycle". As they admitted, it wasn't because they were experienced bicyclists. At that time, few people were. Earlier forms of the bicycle had been awkward and dangerous. With its two equal-sized wheels, chain-driven rear wheel, and inflated rubber tires, the safety bicycle was such a dramatic improvement that virtually all present-day bicycles follow its design. In a sense, the 300 million bicycles now in China owe their existence to these two young men who first demonstrated the advantages of a "little mule that you drive by the ears and kick in the sides to make him go". The inspiration for their journey was apparently Thomas Stevens then popular two volume, 1887-88 work, Around the World on a bicycle. (Stevens bicycle had been what was then called the ordinary design, wich precariously poised its rider some six feet in the air atop a giant wheel). Parts of their route were similar to that of Stevens, but they were proud of the fact that they succeeded at the very point where Stevens failed. Legal and visa difficulties forced Stevens south through India rather than along the more adventurous route Allen and Sachtleben took through almost lawless regions where Russia and China were then vying for power. This book covers the most interesting part of their 15'000 mile, round-the-world trip. It leaves out the 8'000 miles they traveled (like Stevens) across Europe and United States and focuses on their 7'000 mile trip through Asia from Constantinople (Istanbul), then the political center of the Near East, to Peking (today's Beijing), capital of the most populous nation in the Far East. In 1895, just two years after they returned to the United States, another cyclist, Frank G. Lenz (1867-94), was murdered while attempting repeat their adventure.

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: -1868

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: Bicicletta, monociclo, triciclo

Riferimenti complementari: Allen T., Sachtleben W., Across Asia on a bicycle: the journey of two American students from Constantinople to Peking, Inkling Books, 2003

ID: w1635

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Arthur Blessitt detiene il primato di pelegrinaggio più lungo attorno al mondo di 38’102 miglia (61’319 km). Dal 25 dicembre 1969 ha percorso tutti i continenti, attraversando 315 nazioni accompagnato da una croce in legno.

 

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Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: -

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w1719

Internet: -

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q325099

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La coppia di amici ha concepito e realizzato l'EurAsia Expedition 98 a bordo di due Ape TMP 703, partendo da Lisbona il 30 aprile e giungendo a Pechino il 28 novembre 1998, dopo un viaggio di 25'000 km.

«Tutto ebbe inizio sul finir dell'estate del 1997», così l'autore ci introduce al racconto di un viaggio meraviglioso, attraverso il continente eurasiatico «sulle ali di un Ape».

Un viaggio che ripercorre la Via della seta con gli occhi di un uomo di fine millennio quando, dopo lo smantellamento del Muro di Berlino, finalmente l'Est incontrava l'Ovest senza fili spinati. La Guerra Fredda si chiudeva per sempre e tutto ritornava in gioco. Pareva che il mondo dovesse trasformarsi a breve in un villaggio globale. L'Eurasia divenne, per poco, una grande piazza dove tutti si potevano finalmente conoscere, o riconoscere. Un decennio forse irripetibile, che ebbe termine la mattina dell'11 settembre 2001, con il crollo dei grattacieli del World Trade Center.

Sulle ali di un Ape ci accompagna, al ritmo lento del piccolo motocarro, attraverso luoghi lontani, dove il tempo pare essersi fermato, ma tutto è in evoluzione ora più che mai, presentandoci gli amici che di chilometro in chilometro riempiono la storia con le loro vite e i loro pensieri.

Esploriamo le grigie periferie georgiane insieme a Miša, fumiamo l'oppio iraniano con Ahmet, ascoltiamo i racconti di nomadi turkmeni sotto il pergolato di Amen; e poi Ramin, durante i giorni di Teheran, Abu e la sua Samarcanda e altri ancora, che si muovono mescolandosi a Gengis Khan e Tamerlano, ai mullah iraniani, ai cammellieri kirghizi, ai pastori uzbeki, ai mercanti cinesi, agli antichi viaggiatori come il marocchino Ibn Battuta e l'onnipresente Marco Polo.

Mille viaggi in un'avventura coinvolgente, dove davanti ai nostri occhi prendono forma alcune delle regioni più affascinanti del pianeta, i deserti misteriosi dell'Asia centrale e i valichi impervi dell'Himalaya, i vicoli di Istanbul e le maestose madrase di Samarcanda. E ancora Persepoli, Buhara, il deserto del Gobi, Pechino.

https://www.ilgiardinodeilibri.it/ebook/__sulle-ali-di-ape-ebook.php

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Italiana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Asia, Europa

Mezzo di trasporto: Motocicletta, motorino

Riferimenti complementari: Brovelli P., Sulle ali di un Ape, Milano: Corbaccio, 2007

ID: w1746

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Nei primi anni del Novecento, secondo quanto indicato nella sua cartolina, Albert Brochart percorse la strada tra Parigi e Costantinopoli a piedi, per complessivi 6'784 chilometri. Nel 1906 partì da Monaco per stabilire un record sui 5'000 km, da percorrere in 100 giorni.

 

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Iscrizioni: Marcheur français, Paris-Vienne-Constantinople-Vienne-Paris, 6784 kilomètres en 183 jours. Ein grosser Rekord zu Fuss! 5000 Kilom. zu fuss in 100 tagen, Durchschnittsleistung: 50 Kilom. per Tag. Abg. München am 8 Januar 1906, Ank. München am 20. April 1906. reiseroute: München, Stuttgart, Strassburg, Frankfurt, Cöln, Bremen, Hamburg, Stettin, Danzig, Königsberg, Posen, Breslau, dresden, Nürnberg, München. Albert Brochart, rekord-Strecke Linz-Salzburg und zurück, von 15.-17.XII.1905, 251 Kilom. zu Fuss in 2 1/2 Tagen

Nazionalità: Francese

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Europa

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w1742

Internet: -

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Charley Boorman e Ewan McGregor sono i simpatici protagonisti di una doppia serie televisiva trasmessa nel Regno Unito da Sky.

La prima serie, realizzata nel 2004, è intitolata Long Way Round e narra le peripezie dei due motociclisti e della loro troupe lungo il tragitto Londra - New York. Nella seconda serie, intitolata Long Way Down, i due amici si ritrovano per un viaggio che li porta dal punto più a nord della Scozia fino a Capo Agulhas, in Sud Africa.

From 14 April 2004 to 29 July 2004, Ewan McGregor, Charley Boorman, motorcycle riding cameraman Claudio von Planta, along with director/producers David Alexanian and Russ Malkin, travelled from London to New York City via Western and Central Europe, the Ukraine, Western Russia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Siberia and Canada, over a cumulative distance of 18,887 miles (30,396 km). The only sections not undertaken by motorcycle were the 31-mile (50 km) passage through the Channel Tunnel, 580 miles (930 km) by train in Siberia to circumvent the Zilov Gap, several river crossings and a short impassable section in eastern Russia undertaken by truck, and a 2,505-mile (4,031 km) flight from Magadan in eastern Russia to Anchorage, Alaska.

The riders took their BMW motorcycles through deep and swollen rivers, many without functioning bridges, while travelling along the Road of Bones to Magadan. The summer runoff from the icemelt was in full flow and the bikes eventually had to be loaded onto passing trucks to be ferried across a few of the deepest rivers.

The journey passed through twelve countries, starting in the UK, then through France, Belgium, Germany, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Canada, and the USA, ending in New York City.

The team stayed mainly in hotels while in Europe, North America, and the more populated parts of Russia, but frequently had to camp out in Kazakhstan and Mongolia. They visited various sights and landmarks en route, including the Church of Bones in the Czech Republic, the Mask of Sorrow monument (described as the "Mask of Grief" in the show) in Magadan, and Mount Rushmore in the USA. They arrived in New York on schedule, and rode into the city accompanied by a phalanx of bikers including McGregor's father Jim and the Orange County Choppers crew.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Way_Round

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Scozzese

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Africa, America del Nord, Asia, Europa, Russia,

Mezzo di trasporto: Motocicletta, motorino

Riferimenti complementari: McGregor, Ewan, Charley Boorman, and Robert Uhlig. Long Way Round: Chasing Shadows Across the World. New York: Atria Books, 2004.

ID: w2267

Internet: www.longwayround.com 

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q165518

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Lillian Alling era un'emigrante estone che alla fine degli anni Venti decise di rientrare in patria da New York, principalmente a piedi. La sua storia è stata romanzata nel libro intitolato Away.

In the summer of 1927, Lillian Alling, a young Russian immigrant, homesick and compelled to perform menial tasks for a living in New York, made up her mind to go back to her homeland in Europe. Because she had no money for transportation, she decided to hike back to her native country. She tramped to Chicago, to Minneapolis, to Winnipeg, refusing all invitations to ride. She was next seen on the Yukon Telegraph Trail in the northern part of British Columbia, Canada, a small pack on her back and a length of iron pipe in her hand for protection, heading towards Alaska. The provincial police at Hazelton prevented her from making a winter journey through the Canadian wilds, but they were able to detain her only until spring. Starting out again, she hiked along the Telegraph Trail, over the wild mountain passes, finally reaching Dawson where she worked as a cook, purchased and repaired an old boat, and in the spring of 1929, launched it into the waters of the Yukon River right behind the outgoing ice reaching a point east of the Seward Peninsula. She abandoned the boat for overland travel, reaching Nome and later Bering Strait. She was last heard bartering with the Eskimos for boat passage across the Strait to Asia.

Rutstrum C., The new way of the wilderness: the classic guide to survival in the wild, University of Minnesota Press, 2000

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Estone

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: America del Nord, grande nord, Russia

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: Bloom A., Away, Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2008 Rutstrum C., The new way of the wilderness: the classic guide to survival in the wild, University of Minnesota Press, 2000

ID: w1636

Internet: -

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q6548079

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Slavomir Rawicz fu un ufficiale polacco condannato a 25 anni di lavori forzati in un gulag siberiano. Nel 1941 fuggì a piedi con altri 5 compagni, raggiungendo l'India dopo un percorso di 6'500 km. Non vi sono attestazioni concrete sul reale compimento del viaggio, descritto nel romanzo Tra noi e la libertà.

THE WAY BACK: fuga dalla Siberia. Verità o bufala?
Con un inspiegabile ritardo di due anni, esce venerdì 6 luglio nelle sale italiane “The Way Back” di Peter Weir, un film con una fotografia seducente e location spettacolari (di cui parlo su Panorama Travel di luglio, in edicola).

Il regista si è ispirato a una storia vera: quella di Slawomir Rawicz (1915-2004), prigioniero polacco in Siberia nel Gulag 303, da lì fuggito nel 1941 con alcuni compagni e  – dopo un viaggio tanto avventuroso quanto incredibile di 6500 chilometri a piedi – approdato nell’India britannica, dopo aver varcato l’Himalaya. La sua storia è narrata nel libro The Long Walk (1956), riedito in italiano da Corbaccio in occasione dell’uscita del film con il titolo Tra noi e la libertà.

La visione del film mi ha suscitato una serie di domande. Malgrado Weir abbia fatto del suo meglio per rendere la fatica e lo spossamento fisico di questi uomini, è davvero possibile percorrere 6500 chilometri in quelle condizioni, dal freddo estremo siberiano al calore e alla siccità desertica, e poi di nuovo le nevi eterne dell’Himalaya? Si trattava di giovani uomini, certo, ma comunque logorati dalla fatica del gulag e da un’alimentazione scadente e scarsa. E fuori dal campo di prigionia, nessuno era disposto ad aiutarli, come il film The Way Back mostra bene. Come si fa a percorrere 6500 chilometri mangiando per lunghi tratti cortecce di betulla e vermi? E come si fa a trascorrere giorni nel deserto del Gobi senza scorte d’acqua? Per non parlare dei piedi e della condizione delle scarpe!

Qualcuno obietterà che gli uomini da secoli viaggiano per migliaia di chilometri lungo le rotte carovaniere. È vero, ma le percorrono con i loro animali e con adeguate scorte di cibo e di acqua. Chi nel deserto termina l’acqua, arriva a bere il sangue del suo cammello per sopravvivere. Questo gruppo di fuggiaschi non ha avuto nulla su cui contare fino all’arrivo a Lhasa (dove ha ricevuto ospitalità e cibo dai locali). Quanto all’ultimo tratto – l’Himalaya attraversato durante la brutta stagione e senza una guida – ha dell’incredibile. Non ci sono certe di famosi cartelli gialli e blu del Club Alpino Svizzero a indicare destinazioni e distanze sui sentieri!

Dubbiosa, ho fatto un giro sul web. Per scoprire che in effetti, ben prima di me, altri avevano messo in dubbio la veridicità del racconto di Rawicz. Come scrive Patrick Symmes su Outside Magazine, non mancano le perplessità. Alcune legate anche a passaggi molto naif: come l’incontro con due yeti durante il tragitto sull’Himalaya (che Weir ha intelligentemente omesso)! Secondo gli archivi russi, invece, Rawicz sarebbe stato liberato dal gulag nel 1942, e dunque non avrebbe mai compiuto questa rocambolesca fuga.

Verità o bufala? Difficile dirlo. Mi sono goduta il film, e per curiosità affronterò anche il libro, per farmi un’idea di prima mano di un bestseller che ha catturato generazioni di lettori, che hanno comunque voluto credere al suo autore. Esattamente come anch’io, vedendo il film, sono stata sedotta da questa storia. E vorrei davvero che questa fuga verso la libertà, che mette in gioco coraggio, forza di volontà, solidarietà, resistenza fisica dell’essere umano, sia accaduta davvero.

http://mariatatsos.com/blog/the-way-back-fuga-dalla-siberia-verita-o-bufala/

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Polacca

Nascita-morte: 1915-2004

Riferimento geografico: Asia, Russia

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: Rawicz, Slavomir. 2011. Tra noi e la libertà. Milano: Corbaccio. Ne è stato tratto un film The Way Back, girato da regia Peter Weir nel 2012.

ID: w2403

Internet: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C5%82awomir_Rawicz

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q563218

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Nel 1907 Luigi Barzini accompagnò il principe Scipione Borghese nella famosa competizione automobilistica Pechino - Parigi, corsa che vinsero.

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Italiana

Nascita-morte: 1874-1947

Riferimento geografico: Asia, Europa

Mezzo di trasporto: Automobile o altri mezzi a motore

Riferimenti complementari: Barzini L., La metà del mondo vista da un'automobile: da Pechino a Parigi in sessanta giorni, Milano: U. Hoepli, 1908

ID: w1683

Internet: -

Wikidata: -

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Ernst Bromeis ha nuotato nel Reno dalla sorgente alla foce (1'247 chilometri), impiegando 44 giorni. Scopo dell'impresa sportiva Das Blaue Wunder era di sensibilizzare la popolazione all'uso sostenibile dell'acqua e promuoverne il libero accesso.

1247 km a nuoto, la sfida di Ernst Bromeis
Dal Lago di Dentro sul Passo del Lucomagno alla foce del Reno in Olanda

LUCOMAGNO - È iniziata oggi per la seconda volta la sfida di Ernst Bromeis: partito dal Lago di Dentro sul Passo del Lucomagno - il punto più lontano rispetto alla foce del Reno in Olanda - il 46enne grigionese intende percorre a nuoto 1247 Km in direzione nord per sensibilizzare la popolazione all'uso sostenibile dell'acqua e promuoverne il libero accesso. L'uomo aveva già tentato l'impresa nel 2012, ma fu costretto a rinunciare dopo 70 km per problemi di salute dovuti alle basse temperature.

Durante la sua "Expedition 2014" Bromeis sarà accompagnato da un canottista, un addetto alla logistica, il capitano di un battello sul Reno e una cineasta che realizzerà un documentario sull'avventura. Con il motto "Il miracolo blu", dal 2008 il grigionese organizza azioni per rendere attenta l'opinione pubblica sulle risorse idriche.www.tio.ch

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Svizzera

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Europa

Mezzo di trasporto: A nuoto

Riferimenti complementari: Fonte: www.tio.ch, 20.08.2014

ID: w1743

Internet: -

Wikidata: -

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