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Francis Edwin Birtles nel 1905 percorse in bicicletta Fremantle – Melbourne, mentre tra il 1907 e il 1908 andò a Sydney, via Brisbane, Normanton, Darwin, Alice Springs e Adelaide e di nuovo a Sydney. Nel 1909 pubblicò Lonely Lands, che contiene anche le sue fotografie. Nello stesso anno stabilì un nuovo record in bicicletta per la Fremantle - Sydney, mentre tra il 1910 e il 1911 percorse il perimetro australiano.

Nel 1911 stabilì un nuovo record tra Fremantle e Sydney in 38 giorni. Prima di passare alle avventure motorizzate, nel 1912, aveva totalizzato 7 traversate e 2 percorsi completi del perimetro continentale. Tra le tante avventure che realizzò, nel 1928 Birtles diventò la prima persona a percorrere in automobile la tratta da Londra a Melbourne, un viaggio di nove mesi a bordo del mezzo chiamato “The Sundowner”.

Across Australia Records

Perth > Melbourne       
1937; Hubert Opperman: 11 giorni

Perth > Sydney
1896; Arthur Richardson: 31 giorni
1899; Donald Mackay: 40 giorni
1911; Francis Birtles: 31 giorni
1937; Hubert Opperman: 13 giorni
1981; Gabrielle Smith: 84 giorni

Around Australia       
Febbraio 1900; Arthur Richardson: 243 giorni
Marzo 1900; Donald Mackay: 240 giorni

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Australiana

Nascita-morte: 1881-1941

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: Diversi

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w1716

Internet: http://www.nma.gov.au/collections-search/display?irn=37917

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q5480241

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Nel 1867 John Muir percorre a piedi la strada da Indianapolis alle Florida Keys, un'esperienza narrata nel libro intitolato A thousand mile walk to the Gulf, una delle prime opere che tratta il tema delle camminate sulle lunghe distanze.

JOHN MUIR, Earth-planet, Universe. These words are written on the inside cover of the notebook from which the contents of this volume have been taken. They reflect the mood in which the late author and explorer undertook his thousand-mile walk to the Gulf of Mexico a half-century ago. No less does this refreshingly cosmopolitan address, which might have startled any finder of the book, reveal the temper and the comprehensiveness of Mr. Muir s mind. He never was and never could be a parochial student of nature. Even at the early age of twenty-nine his eager interest in every aspect of the natural world had made him a citizen of the universe.

While this was by far the longest botanical excursion which Mr. Muir made in his earlier years, it was by no means the only one. He had botanized around the Great Lakes, in Ontario, and through parts of Wisconsin, Indiana, and Illinois. On these expeditions he had disciplined himself to endure hardship, for his notebooks disclose the fact that he often went hungry and slept in the woods, or on the open prairies, with no cover except the clothes he wore.

"Oftentimes," he writes in some unpublished biographical notes, "I had to sleep out with out blankets, and also without supper or break fast. But usually I had no great difficulty in finding a loaf of bread in the widely scattered clearings of the farmers. With one of these big backwoods loaves I was able to wander many a long, wild mile, free as the winds in the glorious forests and bogs, gathering plants and feeding on God s abounding, inexhaustible spiritual beauty bread. Only once in my long Canada wanderings was the deep peace of the wilderness savagely broken. It happened in the maple woods about midnight, when I was cold and my fire was low. I was awakened by the awfully dismal howling of the wolves, and got up in haste to replenish the fire."

It was not, therefore, a new species of adventure upon which Mr. Muir embarked when he started on his Southern foot-tour. It was only a new response to the lure of those favorite studies which he had already pursued over uncounted miles of virgin Western forests and prairies. Indeed, had it not been for the accidental injury to his right eye in the month of March, 1867, he probably would have started somewhat earlier than he did. In a letter written to Indianapolis friends on the day after the accident, he refers mournfully to the interrup tion of a long-cherished plan. "For weeks," he writes, "I have daily consulted maps in locating a route through the Southern States, the West Indies, South America, and Europe a botanical journey studied for years. And so my mind has long been in a glow with visions of the glories of a tropical flora; but, alas, I am half blind. My right eye, trained to minute analysis, is lost and I have scarce heart to open the other. Had this journey been accomplished, the stock of varied beauty acquired would have made me willing to shrink into any corner of the world, however obscure and however remote."

The injury to his eye proved to be less serious than he had at first supposed. In June he was writing to a friend: "I have been reading and botanizing for some weeks, and find that for such work I am not very much disabled. I leave this city [Indianapolis] for home to-morrow, accompanied by Merrill Moores, a little friend of mine. We will go to Decatur, Illinois, thence northward through the wide prairies, botanizing a few weeks by the way. ... I hope to go South towards the end of the summer, and as this will be a journey that I know very little about, I hope to profit by your counsel before setting out."
In an account written after the excursion he says: "I was eager to see Illinois prairies on my way home, so we went to Decatur, near the center of the State, thence north [to Portage] by Rockford and Janesville. I botanized one week on the prairie about seven miles south-west of Pecatonica. ... To me all plants are more precious than before. My poor eye is not better, nor worse. A cloud is over it, but ingazing over the widest landscapes, I am not always sensible of its presence."

By the end of August Mr. Muir was back again in Indianapolis. He had found it convenient to spend a "botanical week" among his University friends in Madison. So keen was his interest in plants at this time that an interval of five hours spent in Chicago was promptly turned to account in a search for them. "I did not find many plants in her tumultuous streets," he complains; "only a few grassy plants of wheat, and two or three species of weeds, amaranth, purslane, carpet-weed, etc., the weeds, I suppose, for man to walk upon, the wheat to feed him. I saw some green algae, but no mosses. Some of the latter I expected to see on wet walls, and in seams on the pavements. But I suppose that the manufacturers smoke and the terrible noise are too great for the hardiest of them. I wish I knew where I was going. Doomed to be "carried of the spirit into the wilderness/ I suppose. I wish I could be more moderate in my desires, but I cannot, and so there is no rest."

The letter noted above was written only two days before he started on his long walk to Florida. If the concluding sentences still reflect indecision, they also convey a hint of the overmastering impulse under which he was acting. The opening sentences of his journal, afterwards crossed out, witness to this sense of inward compulsion which he felt." Few bodies," he wrote, "are inhabited by so satisfied a soul that they are allowed exemption from extraordinary exertion through a whole life." After reciting illustrations of nature s periodicity, of the ebbs and flows of tides, and the pulsation of other forces, visible and invisible, he observes that " so also there are tides not only in the affairs of men, but in the primal thing of life it self. In some persons the impulse, being slight, is easily obeyed or overcome. But in others it is constant and cumulative in action until its power is sufficient to overmaster all impediments, and to accomplish the full measure of its demands. For many a year I have been impelled toward the Lord s tropic gardens of the South. Many influences have tended to blunt or bury this constant longing, but it has out lived and overpowered them all."

Muir s love of nature was so largely a part of his religion that he naturally chose Biblical phraseology when he sought a vehicle for his feelings. No prophet of old could have taken his call more seriously, or have entered upon his mission more freyently. During the long days of his confinement in a dark room he had opportunity for much reflection. He concluded that life was too brief and uncertain, and time too precious, to waste upon belts and saws ; that while he was pottering in a wagon factory, God was making a world ; and he determined that, if his eyesight was spared, he would devote the remainder of his life to a study of the process. Thus the previous bent of his habits and studies, and the sobering thoughts induced by one of the bitterest experiences of his life, combined to send him on the long journey recorded in these pages.

Some autobiographical notes found among his papers furnish interesting additional details about the period between his release from the dark room and his departure for the South. "As soon as I got out into heaven s light," he says, "I started on another long excursion, making haste with all my heart to store my mind with the Lord s beauty, and thus be ready for any fate, light or dark. And it was from this time that my long, continuous wanderings may be said to have fairly commenced. I bade adieu to mechanical inventions, determined to devote the rest of my life to the study of the inventions of God. I first went home to Wisconsin, botanizing by the way, to take leave of my father and mother, brothers and sisters, all of whom were still living near Portage. I also visited the neighbors I had known as a boy, renewed my acquaintance with them after an absence of several years, and bade each a formal good-bye. When they asked where I was going I said, Oh! I don t know just anywhere in the wilderness, southward. I have already had glorious glimpses of the Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, Indiana, and Canada wildernesses; now I propose to go South and see something of the vegetation of the warm end of the country, and if possible to wander far enough into South America to see tropical vegetation in all its palmy glory.

"The neighbors wished me well, advised me to be careful of my health, and reminded me that the swamps in the South were full of malaria. I stopped overnight at the home of an old Scotch lady who had long been my friend and was now particularly motherly in good wishes and advice. I told her that as I was sauntering along the road, just as the sun was going down, I heard a darling speckled-breast sparrow singing, The day s done, the day s done/ Weel, John, my dear laddie, she replied, your day will never be done. There is no end to the kind of studies you like so well, but there s an end to mortals strength of body and mind, to all that mortals can accomplish.You are sure to go on and on, but I want you to remember the fate of Hugh Miller. She was one of the finest examples I ever knew of a kind, generous, great-hearted Scotchwoman."

The formal leave-taking from family and neighbors indicates his belief that he was parting from home and friends for a long time. On Sunday, the ist of September, 1867, Mr. Muir said good-bye also to his Indianapolis friends, and went by rail to Jeffersonville, where he spent the night. The next morning he crossed the river, walked through Louisville, and struck southward through the State of Kentucky. A letter written a week later "among the hills of Bear Creek, seven miles southeast of Burkesville, Kentucky," shows that he had covered about twenty-five miles a day. "I walked from Louisville," he says, "a distance of one hundred and seventy miles, and my feet are sore. But, oh! I am paid for all my toil a thousand times over. I am in the woods on a hilltop with my back against a moss-clad log.
I wish you could see my last evening s bedroom. The sun has been among the tree-tops for more than an hour; the dew is nearly all taken back, and the shade in these hill basins is creeping away into the unbroken strongholds of the grand old forests.

"I have enjoyed the trees and scenery of Kentucky exceedingly. How shall I ever tell of the miles and miles of beauty that have been flowing into me in such measure ? These lofty curving ranks of lobing, swelling hills, these concealed valleys of fathomless verdure, and these lordly trees with the nursing sunlight glancing in their leaves upon the outlines of the magnificent masses of shade embosomed among their wide branches these are cut into my memory to go with me forever.

"I was a few miles south of Louisville when I planned my journey. I spread out my map under a tree and made up my mind to go through Kentucky, Tennessee, and Georgia to Florida, thence to Cuba, thence to some part of South America; but it will be only a hasty walk. I am thankful, however, for so much. My route will be through Kingston and Madisonville, Tennessee, and through Blairsville and Gainesville, Georgia. Please write me at Gainesville. I am terribly letter-hungry. I hardly dare to think of home and friends."

In editing the journal I have endeavored, by use of all the available evidence, to trail Mr. Muir as closely as possible on maps of the sixties as well as on the most recent state and topographical maps. The one used by him has not been found, and probably is no longer in exist ence. Only about twenty-two towns and cities are mentioned in his journal. This constitutes a very small number when one considers the distance he covered. Evidently he was so absorbed in the plant life of the region traversed that he paid no heed to towns, and perhaps avoided them wherever possible.

The sickness which overtook him in Florida was probably of a malarial kind, although he describes it under different names. It was, no doubt, a misfortune in itself, and a severe test for his vigorous constitution. But it was also a blessing in disguise, inasmuch as it prevented him from carrying out his foolhardy plan of penetrating the tropical jungles of South America along the Andes to a tributary of the Amazon, and then floating down the river on a raft to the Atlantic. As readers of the jour nal will perceive, he clung to this intention even during his convalescence at Cedar Keys and in Cuba. In a letter dated the 8th of November he describes himself as "just creeping about getting plants and strength after my fever."
Then he asks his correspondent to direct let ters to New Orleans, Louisiana. " I shall have to go there," he writes, "for a boat to South America. I do not yet know to which point in South America I had better go." His hope to find there a boat for South America explains an otherwise mystifying letter in which he requested his brother David to send him a certain sum of money by American Express order to New Orleans. As a matter of fact he did not go into Louisiana at all, either because he learned that no south-bound ship was available at the mouth of the Mississippi, or because the unexpected appearance of the Island Belle in the harbor of Cedar Keys caused him to change his plans.

In later years Mr. Muir himself strongly disparaged the wisdom of his plans with respect to South America, as may be seen in the chapter that deals with his Cuban sojourn. The judgment there expressed was lead-penciled into his journal during a reading of it long after wards. Nevertheless the Andes and the South American forests continued to fascinate his imagination, as his letters show, for many years after he came to California. When the long deferred journey to South America was finally made in 1911, forty-four years after the first attempt, he whimsically spoke of it as the fulfillment of those youthful dreams that moved him to undertake his thousand-mile walk to the Gulf.

Mr. Muir always recalled with gratitude the Florida friends who nursed him through his long and serious illness. In 1898, while traveling through the South on a forest-inspection tour with his friend Charles Sprague Sargent, he took occasion to revisit the scenes of his early adventures. It may be of interest to quote some sentences from letters written at that time to his wife and to his sister Sarah. "I have been down the east side of the Florida peninsula along the Indian River," he writes, "through the palm and pine forests to Miami, and thence to Key West and the southmost keys stretching out towards Cuba. Returning, I crossed over to the west coast by Palatka to Cedar Keys, on my old track made thirty-one years ago, in search of the Hodgsons who nursed me through my long attack of fever. Mr. Hodgson died long ago, also the eldest son, with whom I used to go boating among the keys while slowly convalescing."

He then tells how he found Mrs. Hodgson and the rest of the family at Archer. They had long thought him dead and were naturally very much surprised to see him. Mrs. Hodgson was in her garden and he recognized her, though the years had altered her appearance. Let us give his own account of the meeting: "I asked her if she knew me. No, I don t/ she said; tell me your name. Muir, I replied. John Muir? My California John Muir? she almost screamed. I said, Yes, John Muir; and you know I promised to return and visit you in about twenty-five years, and though I am a little late six or seven years I ve done the best I could/ The eldest boy and girl remembered the stories I told them, and when they read about the Muir Glacier they felt sure it must have been named for me. I stopped at Archer about four hours, and the way we talked over old times you may imagine." From Savannah, on the same trip, he wrote: "Here is where I spent a hungry, weary, yet happy week camping in Bonaventure graveyard thirty-one years ago. Many changes, I am told, have been made in its graves and avenues of late, and how many in my life!"

In perusing this journal the reader will miss the literary finish which Mr. Muir was accustomed to give to his later writings. This fact calls for no excuse. Not only are we dealing here with the earliest product of his pen, but with impressions and observations written down hastily during pauses in his long march. He apparently intended to use this raw material at some time for another book. If the record, as it stands, lacks finish and adornment, it also possesses the immediacy and the freshness of first impressions.

The sources which I have used in preparing this volume are threefold: (i) the original journal, of which the first half contained many interlinear revisions and expansions, and a considerable number of rough pencil sketches of plants, trees, scenery, and notable adventures; a wide-spaced, typewritten, rough copy of the journal, apparently in large part dictated to a stenographer; it is only slightly revised, and comparison with the original journal shows many significant omissions and additions; two separate elaborations of his experiences in Savannah when he camped there for a week in the Bonaventure graveyard. Throughout my work upon the primary and secondary materials I was impressed with the scrupu lous fidelity with which he adhered to the facts and impressions set down in the original journal.

Readers of Muir s writings need scarcely be told that this book, autobiographically, bridges the period between The Story of my Boyhood and Youth and My First Summer in the Sierra.
However, one span of the bridge was lacking, for the journal ends with Mr. Muir s arrival in San Francisco about the first of April, 1868, while his first summer in the Sierra was that of 1869. By excerpting from a letter a summary account of his first visit to Yosemite, and including a description of Twenty Hill Hollow, where he spent a large part of his first year in California, the connection is made complete.
The last chapter was first published as an article in the Overland Monthly of July, 1872.

 

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Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Scozzese

Nascita-morte: 1838–1914

Riferimento geografico: Nord America

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: Muir, John, and William Frederic Badè. 1916. A thousand-mile walk to the Gulf. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

ID: w2853

Internethttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Muir

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q379580

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Il gruppo di due svizzeri e un italiano ha percorso 15'000 chilometri a bordo di un'automobile, tra Lugano e Ulan Bator, in Mongolia, nell'ambito della manifestazione benefica Mongolia Charity Rally 2013, una corsa non competitiva promossa dall'organizzazione inglese Go Help.

Enough of the hyperbole, let’s get down to the nuts and bolts of this charity rally.

Only the courageous need apply. The journey of a lifetime begins with a single step: summoning up the courage to sign-up for the Mongolia Charity Rally.

Pick your team. After crossing the Rubicon, there is no going back. Unless you break down, in which case there might be. The next step is to pick your posse. You’re going to spend a month rallying halfway across the world with this team, so think long and hard about who the most annoying people you know are, and make sure not to ask them. Teams are usually made up of between two to four people.

Pick a Route: Pick a country, any country… then drive through it. As long as you end up in Mongolia, this part is the easy part. You don’t even need a map. If you want to try to get to Mongolia by asking people the way, that works. We know. We’ve done it.

Pick a car. Ambulance? Firetruck? 4×4? Ice-cream van? You name it, we’ve had it on the Mongolia Charity Rally. Your chosen vehicle will be like a third nipple to you by the time you get to Mongolia. You’ll cherish it fondly, but be glad to part with it. That’s where we come in: we’ll take your beloved charitable chariot to its next home. If it’s an ambulance, it will get used in our charity project. 4x4s are typically donated to other NGOs, and commercial vehicles and cars get sold at auction for way more than they are worth in Europe, with the proceeds invested in Go Help’s charity projects in Mongolia that you’ll see on arrival. The Mongolian government is, to put it mildly, very strict about what cars it allows in to Mongolia, so we’ll help you with vehicle selection, not to worry.

Hit your fundraising target. This charity rally has three objectives, first: charity. Second, did we mention charity? Third: charitable adventuring. Teams rundraise a minimum of £1,000 for Go Help, the charity that founded the Mongolia Charity Rally, and above that can fundraise for any awesome cause that captures their heart. Hopefully Go Help, but if not, any one that does.

Find some sponsors. No trust fund? No problem. Many teams make it to Mongolia on a shoestring budget. That being said, life is a lot easier with generous benefactors. Teams are supported by a vast array of corporate sponsors (Subaru provided a whole car to one of our teams!), employers (corporate matching rocks), friends and family (hello, long lost relations). Key here is to pound the pavement, this charity rally really sells itself.

Beat the bureaucracy. You probably need a visa or two to get to Mongolia. Maybe even an entry permit to get in to Mongolia. Secret code to get in to Turkmenistan? Check. With a little help from us (to make sure your ‘T’s are crossed and ‘i’s are dotted, and to ensure everyone is fully prepared), you’ll set off from Brussels, not to be seen again until you reach Mongolia!
http://mongolia.charityrallies.org/about-the-mongolia-rally/

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Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Svizzera

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Asia

Mezzo di trasporto: Automobile o altri mezzi a motore

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w2291

Internet: http://mongolia.charityrallies.org

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q6899619

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Camminatore inglese che ha attraversato il Giappone a piedi, publicando successivamente il libro The roads to Sata: A two-thousand-mile walk through Japan.

Alan Booth (5 December 1946 – 24 January 1993) was an English travel writer who wrote two books on his journeys on foot through the Japanese countryside. The better-known of the two, The Roads to Sata (published in 1985) is about his travels (in 1977) from the northernmost cape in Hokkaidō (Cape Soya) to the southern tip of Kyūshū in Cape Sata. The second, Looking for the Lost, was published posthumously in 1995. Booth also wrote a guidebook to Japan as well as numerous articles on Japan and other topics.

Booth was born in Leytonstone, London, and studied drama at Leyton County High School for Boys. While he was still at school he formed and directed the Leyton Youth Theatre Company, for which Leyton District Council provided a grant and free use of public buildings for performances, including productions of Hamlet and Othello.

Booth studied drama at the University of Birmingham, where he became a prominent member of its Guild Theatre Group (GTG). Among the plays he directed for the GTG were Hamlet (First Quarto), done in Booth's version of Noh style, and his own translation of Racine's Phèdre, set in a Samurai milieu. He also directed an open-air production of Marlowe's Faustus) in Cannon Hill Park. He won the Birmingham Post's Annual Poetry Prize and was a regular contributor to the university's magazine of students' verse, Mermaid.

In 1970 Booth moved to Japan to study Noh theatre, but soon began writing. For the next 20 years he lived in Tokyo and worked for the Macmillan Press, and as a film reviewer for the Asahi Evening News. He also appeared in the BBC Learning Zone programme Japanese Language and People, episode 6, "On the Road", in which he was interviewed about aspects of life in Japan.

Alan Booth died of colon cancer in 1993, leaving his second wife and their daughter.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Booth

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Inglese

Nascita-morte: 1946-1993

Riferimento geografico: Giappone

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari:

  • Booth, Alan. 1986. The roads to Sata: a 2000-mile walk through Japan. Harmondsworth: Viking.

ID: w2857

Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Booth

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q4706210

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L'emulo di Phileas Fogg ha ripercorso le tappe del celebre personaggio di Verne in quattro giorni e 19 ore. L'idea gli fu suggerita dal figlio che aveva appena terminato di leggere il romanzo.

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: -

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: Aeroplano

Riferimenti complementari: Audibert J.-M., Le tour du monde en 4 jours, Broché, 1953

ID: w1667

Internet: -

Wikidata: -

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Tra il 1990 e il 1991 Archambeau realizza un giro del mondo con Hervé Archambeau e Denis Gittard. Al suo ritorno pubblica il volume 600 jours de route - Une aventure géographique.

 

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Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Francese

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: Automobile o altri mezzi a motore

Riferimenti complementari: Archambeau Olivier,  Archambeau Hervé. 2002. 600 jours de route, une aventure géographique. Paris: EGF.

ID: w1657

Internet: -

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q3350761

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Viaggio dall'Alaska alla Terra del Fuoco: 254'000 chilometri in vespa. L'autore ha continuato a viaggiare in vespa da Roma a Saigon.

La notizia arrivata dal Sud della Cina ha colpito improvvisamente tutto il grande "popolo dei viaggiatori": il 16 settembre ci ha lasciati Giorgio Bettinelli, vinto da un'infezione sulle rive del Mekong. Giorgio, meglio conosciuto come lo Scrittore-in-Vespa e spesso affettuosamente soprannominato "Vespista per Caso" era forse uno degli ultimi grandi avventurieri-esploratori esistenti, quelli che - per intenderci - fanno del viaggio la missione della propria vita e trovano realizzazione nell'incontro con altri popoli, culture e luoghi. Tra i suoi memorabili viaggi in Vespa iniziati per gioco nel 1992, ricordiamo le traversate dall'Alaska alla Terra del Fuoco, da Melbourne a Città del Capo e poi dal Cile alla Tasmania, attraverso Americhe, Siberia, Europa, Africa, Asia e Oceania. Sempre su due ruote, fino all'ultima grande impresa in cui ha toccato per la prima volta tutte le 33 regioni dell'immensa regione cinese.

Giorgio non era "solo" un viaggiatore, ma anche un bravo giornalista e scrittore, capace di accompagnare ogni sua avventura da racconti vividi e appassionanti, diari on the road pubblicati da Feltrinelli, da riviste specializzate, oppure semplicemente sul suo blog personale. Storie che spesso sembrano di fantasia, tra gomme bucate nei momenti meno indicati, passaggi dati a personaggi strambi, panorami colti con il vento in faccia tra la polvere sollevata dalla Vespa, persino rapimenti, come quella volta in Congo in cui...

...La verità è che Giorgio, come tutti i veri avventurieri, sembrava inattaccabile, a dispetto di ogni ostacolo. Questo rende la notizia della sua scomparsa ancora più dolorosa, accompagnata dalle parole della moglie Yapei:

Sono triste, desolata ma Giorgio non è più con noi, vola libero come un uccello, è in viaggio, ma in un altro mondo, freddo.

Giorgio voleva scrivere un libro sul Tibet, ma non può più farlo, ora ha bisogno di dormire.

Non so cosa posso fare per continuare il suo sogno, alle sue parole e al suo amore verso di noi.

www.turistipercaso.it

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Italiana

Nascita-morte: 1955-2008

Riferimento geografico: America del Nord, Asia

Mezzo di trasporto: Motocicletta, motorino

Riferimenti complementari: Bettinelli G., In Vespa, Da Roma a Saigon, Milano: Feltrinelli, 2003

ID: w1710

Internet: -

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q3765290

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Sir Francis Chichester è stato un aviatore e navigatore britannico che a 65 anni navigò in solitaria attorno al mondo. Partito il 27 agosto 1966 da Plymouth a bordo della Gypsy Moth IV, fu il primo uomo a circumnavigare il globo doppiando tutti i grandi capi: Capo Horn, Capo di Buona Speranza e Capo Leeuwin.

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Inglese

Nascita-morte: 1901-1972

Riferimento geografico: Giro del mondo

Mezzo di trasporto: Barca, nave

Riferimenti complementari: -

ID: w1785

Internet: -

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q1441448

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Il 25 aprile 2001 Alberto Fiorin, Aldo Maroso e altri 8 amici partono da Venezia in bicicletta destinazione Pechino. La Via della Seta richiede 96 giorni di sforzi per un totale di 12'000 chilometri.

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Italiana

Nascita-morte: -1960

Riferimento geografico: Asia, Europa, Via dell'ambra

Mezzo di trasporto: Bicicletta, monociclo, triciclo

Riferimenti complementari: Maroso A., Fiorin A., Strade d’Oriente : in bicicletta da Venezia a Pechino, Ediciclo editore, 2003

ID: w1937

Internet: -

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Nel 1990 Bill Irvin è stato il primo cieco a percorrere per intero e in una sola stagione (thru-hike) l'Appalachian Trail. Ha camminato lungo le 2'169 miglia accompagnato dal cane Orient.

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Appalachian trail

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: Irvin B., Blind Courage, WRS Group, Incorporated, 1995

ID: w2075

Internet:

blindcouragethemovie.com

www.billirvin.com 

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Roberto Regini è un "uomo senza casa" appassionato di trekking. Ha avuto la fortuna di praticare questa attività in tutti e cinque i continenti.

Come un antico esploratore

Quarantanove giorni di cammino in tre regioni, Terra del Fuoco, Aysén e Patagonia, per un totale di 700-800 chilometri in solitaria e 3.100 euro di spesa complessiva. Roberto Regini (41 anni), l’intrepido viaggiatore originario di Empoli che ha deciso di dedicare buona parte della sua vita a “esplorare” il mondo, è appena rientrato dalla sua ultima avventura con lo zaino in spalla (www.robyexplorer.net).
“Sono partito lo scorso 31 gennaio, scegliendo come al solito un periodo fuori stagione per evitare i grandi afflussi turistici, le spese elevate e soprattutto per avere l’occasione di vivere più intensamente i luoghi che attraversavo”.

Se non sbaglio, hai camminato “al contrario”…
Sì, anziché seguire il tradizionale percorso da Buenos Aires a Ushuaia, ho fatto esattamente l’opposto, dal sud verso il nord. Siccome non era il mio primo viaggio in quelle terre, questa volta ho scelto di visitare le zone meno conosciute e questo, insieme al fatto che la stagione turistica era ormai terminata, mi ha permesso di immergermi completamente nella solitudine che cerco: in alcune traversate non ho incontrato nessuno per giorni, in altre ho avuto rari scambi con escursionisti come me. Anche le notti in cui ho avuto qualche tenda accanto alla mia si contano sulle dita di una mano.

E per rifornirti?
Mi appoggiavo ai vari villaggi, che in quelle zone distano anche centinaia di chilometri l’uno dall’altro, mentre ricorrevo agli ostelli familiari per la doccia e l’igiene personale. Facevo la spesa nei supermercati locali, dove ho avuto modo di notare qualcosa di molto curioso: nonostante l’abbondante costa affacciata sull’oceano, i banchi del pesce sono rarissimi in Cile e Argentina. La maggior parte del pescato viene destinata all’esportazione.

Rispetto ai tuoi viaggi precedenti, hai avuto conferme?
La prima riguarda il clima: ho avuto la fortuna di trovare un’estate splendida, con temperature fino a dieci gradi sopra la media stagionale, mentre quelle zone (la Patagonia in particolare) sono note per le condizioni meteorologiche estremamente variabili e per il forte vento. Se questo è stato propizio per il mio stile di viaggio, cioè il trekking, d’altra parte mi ha confermato il drammatico problema del surriscaldamento climatico. Un’altra conferma riguarda la gente, straordinariamente ospitale.

C’è differenza tra cileni e argentini?
Forse lieve, ma esiste. Il popolo argentino è più diretto e gioioso, mentre quello cileno appare più freddo, anche se molto accogliente.

Oltre all’isolamento, immagino che la problematica principale di questo viaggio sia stata la difficoltà di reperire mezzi di trasporto.
L’aspetto positivo di Cile e Argentina è la loro sicurezza, tanto che non è raro incontrare persone che la notte riposano tranquillamente con la porta aperta. In compenso, però, gli spostamenti necessitano di molta pazienza, perché i mezzi di trasporto hanno frequenze piuttosto sporadiche, spesso a distanza di giorni. Per esempio, oltre al gommone turistico che permette di raggiungere l’isola di Navarino e la sua Puerto Williams, la cittadina di circa duemila abitanti più australe del mondo, per il ritorno esiste un traghetto che parte una volta la settimana verso Punta Arenas.

Lo hai preso?
Sì e sono sceso, nel mezzo della notte, nella baia di Yendegaia per intraprendere una traversata a piedi, camminando su un terreno difficile e privo di qualsiasi sentiero, dove l’ultimo turista era passato tre settimane prima. Per il resto, mi sono affidato all’autostop, strappando un passaggio prima a tre pescatori e poi a tre camionisti, che mi hanno anche regalato pane, formaggio, prosciutto e persino un bicchiere di vino, visto che ormai ero rimasto a secco. Più a sud ci si trova, meno mezzi di trasporto si incontrano: tra i villaggi, i collegamenti non sono quotidiani come siamo abituati nelle nostre città.

Incontri particolari?
Nella baia di Yendegaia, ho incontrato gli unici due abitanti: il gestore di un rifugio, Josè, gaucho cileno, con la sua compagna, una donna belga che da sei anni ha lasciato il suo paese – dove gestiva un centro estetico – per vivere di “natura”. È stato lui a fornirmi preziose indicazioni per i miei spostamenti, raccomandandomi di seguire le impronte dei cavalli ferrati anziché quelle “senza ferro”, che appartengono ai cavalli selvatici. Quando gli ho chiesto quanto tempo pensava di rimanere laggiù, mi ha risposto semplicemente: “Non lo so, forse un mese, forse tutta la vita. Vivo alla giornata”.

Una scelta estrema.
Assolutamente sì. È impossibile esprimere a parole quello che si prova incontrando queste persone, che hanno scelto una vita “antica”. Nella regione dell’Aysén ho conosciuto anche Ramon, che mi ha offerto mate, una tipica bevanda del sud, e ha cucinato per me un salmone appena pescato. Anche lui preferisce vivere lontano da tutto e da tutti, rinunciando al benessere cittadino. Spesso, nei miei viaggi, incontro queste persone straordinarie, felici e realizzate nella loro semplicità e devo ammettere che mi capita di pensare che, se un giorno dovessi stancarmi dei viaggi, mi piacerebbe diventare come loro. La scoperta straordinaria è che non sono l’unico a pensarla così.

Hai incontrato altre persone alla ricerca della semplicità?
Sempre più spesso incontro europei stufi del loro stile di vita consumistico e materialistico, che vanno in giro per il mondo con pochi soldi in tasca e tanto entusiasmo – molti in bici, anche per molti mesi – alla ricerca di ambienti genuini. La filosofia comune è che si può essere molto felici con poco.

Come sono i paesaggi?
Cambiano in pochi metri di quota: in basso ci sono boschi ricchissimi di vegetazione, tra cui l’albero dell’Araucania, una pianta che cresce solo in questa regione; più in alto c’è pieno deserto, grazie alle eruzioni dei vulcani Lonquimay e Tolhuaca. Una varietà straordinaria.

Sei rientrato da pochi giorni, ma hai già in mente una nuova partenza?
Sì, normalmente verso la fine di ogni viaggio penso a cosa mi piacerebbe vedere nella prossima “puntata” e stabilisco ambiente, persone, percorsi e cultura che vorrei incontrare. Tra pochi mesi toccherà all’Asia centrale, con cui proseguirò questo mio desiderio di trasformare la passione per il viaggio in un lavoro e uno stile di vita. Ho già controllato i voli aerei e sto valutando le questioni burocratiche da risolvere. Tutto resto è nella mia testa!

http://www.luomoconlavaligia.it/robyexplorer-come-un-antico-esploratore.html

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Italiana

Nascita-morte: -

Riferimento geografico: Africa, Asia, Europa, America del Nord, America del Sud, America centrale

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: Cavalleri F., Zaino in spalla e via, Roberto Regini: l’uomo senza casa ci racconta il suo mondo di viaggi, La Regione Ticino, 11.07.2013

ID: w2412

Internet: -

Wikidata: -

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Autrice del volume Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, in cui narrano le sue vicende personali lungo il Pacific Crest Trail. Dal suo libro è stato tratto il film Wild (2014).

 

Pseudonimo: -

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Americana

Nascita-morte: -1968

Riferimento geografico: America del Nord

Mezzo di trasporto: A piedi

Riferimenti complementari: Strayed, Cheryl, e Mondadori. Wild. Milano: Piemme, 2012.

ID: w1784

Internet: http://www.cherylstrayed.com/

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q5092780

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Ginevrina poliedrica e appassionata di viaggi, negli anni Trenta del Novecento partì per la Russia, il Turkestan, la Cina, l'Asia centrale. Ne trasse diversi libri di successo; nel 1939 raggiunse l'India in automobile in compagnia di Annemarie Schwarzenbach, un viaggio che tradusse in un'opera intitolata La via crudele, Due donne in viaggio dall'Europa a Kabul.

 

Pseudonimo: Kini

Iscrizioni: -

Nazionalità: Svizzera

Nascita-morte: 1903-1997

Riferimento geografico: Asia, Europa

Mezzo di trasporto: Diversi

Riferimenti complementari:
Maillart E., Oasi proibite : una donna in viaggio da Pechino al Kashmir, EDT, 2001
Ella Maillart – Double Journey, Antonio Bigini, Mariann Lewinsky Sträuli, 40 Min., 2015

ID: w2224

Internet: www.ellamaillart.ch

Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q19685776

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