Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: USA
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Wagon-cart, Carro-carretto, Char-Chariot
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: USA
Inscriptions-Iscrizioni-Inscriptions: Sustained loss of both legs at West Paris, Maine, August 14, 1907, while employed as brakeman on the Grand Trunk Railway System
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Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: Belgium, Belgio, Belgique
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: On foot-A piedi-A pied
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
Inscriptions-Iscrizioni-Inscriptions: Alex Van Dyck Lierre (Belgique) parcourt tous les pays du Monde
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Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: Wanderwell Walter
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: -
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Various-Diversi-Différents
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
Internet: http://www.alohawanderwell.com
Inscriptions-Iscrizioni-Inscriptions: Wanderwell world tour 175,000 miles around the world - for the world

The female Indiana Jones! Fascinating images capture the adventures of a 1920s traveller who visited 80 countries... in a Model T Ford

Aloha Wanderwell from Winnipeg in Canada has been described as a female Indiana Jones
The teenage adventurer toured the world aged 16 after answering an ad for a driver in a French newspaper
She went on to travel 380,000 miles over the course of the 1920s and became a global celebrity

Nowadays, backpacking around the world has almost become a rite of passage for a certain breed of teenager.

But back in the day, the spectacle of a 16-year-old girl touring the globe was enough to turn her into a worldwide celebrity.

Aloha Wanderwell from Winnipeg in Canada has been described as a female Indiana Jones after becoming the first woman to drive around the globe, visiting 43 countries in a Ford Model-T in her teens.

She went on to travel 380,000 miles over the course of the 1920s, visiting a total of 80 countries.

During her travels, she made some of the earliest films of the Bororo people of Brazil, became the first woman to fly the country’s Mato Grosso state and filmed the first flight around the world.

Wanderwell, who was born as Idris Galcia Hall, first got a taste for travel as a child when she began reading her British Army reservist father’s collection of boy’s adventure books.

In 1922, at the age of 16 and now living in France with her mother and sister following the death of her father in the First World War, she answered a newspaper advert asking for, ‘Brains, Beauty & Breeches – World Tour Offer For Lucky Young Woman… Wanted to join an expedition!’

The advert had been placed in the Riviera edition of the Paris Herald by a man called Captain Walter Wanderwell (real name Valerian Johannes Piecynski), an adventurer, inventor and former sailor who was looking for a French-speaking secretary and driver on his expedition to promote world peace.

The captain met Idris in Paris and was so impressed with her sense of adventure that he immediately gave her the stage name ‘Aloha Wanderwell’ and signed her up.

The pair embarked on a decade-long trip around the globe just a few weeks later and Aloha quickly became the star of the show.

In their first adventure, the duo visited 43 countries on four continents, including the battlefields of France, post-war Germany, Egypt, Palestine, India, East Africa, Indo-China and Siberia, where she was given the title of 'Honorary Colonel' by the Red Army.

On a subsequent tour of the US, Aloha and the captain got married and they went on to have two children, Nile and Valri, but the new arrivals didn’t dull their sense of adventure.

They released a documentary about their first world tour that made them famous across the western world. They then followed this up with a second tour, which incorporated the Amazon jungles of Brazil, where their plane crashed.

After the crash, Aloha befriended the local Bororos tribes and made her second documentary called Flight to the Stone Age Bororos.

Unfortunately, Captain Wanderwell was murdered in 1932 in California, but Aloha continued her travels.

After marrying the cameraman for the next stages of her adventures, Walter Baker, in the early 1930s, she went on tour the world with him for much of her life, making films and writing about her experiences - and the results are displayed in museums across the world.

She passed away in California in 1996 at the age of 90.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-4048936/The-female-Indiana-Jones-Fascinating-images-capture-adventures-1920s-traveller-visited-80-countries-Model-T-Ford.html

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Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: -
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Velocipede-Vélocipède
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: USA
Internet: http://www.thewheelmen.org

Van Meerbeke is described at a young athlete from the New York City area who, Karl Kron (Ten Thousand Miles on a Bicycle, 1887) believed, was born about 1865. He must have been a dedicated cyclist for, although it was not given press coverage at the time, he is thought to have made a round trip ride between New York and Denver in 1885 (Kron, xcvii). Not wishing to cover much of this route again on a transcontinental ride in 1886, he took a southern route west. He began the ride from the New York City Hall at noon on March 1 on a Columbia ordinary with the hope of reaching San Francisco in 150 days.
His ride took him through Philadelphia, Baltimore, Lynchville, Danville, Atlanta, Montgomery, Mobile, New Orleans, Houston, San Antonio, Del Rio, El Paso, Deming, Benson, Tucson, Yuma, Los Angeles, Mojave, and Goshen. He was forced to be ferried or "ride the cars" (take a train) because of floods near Mobile and Yuma and a bicycle breakdown near Del Rio.
He arrived in San Francisco about September 9th (Admission Day), having covered more than 4,000 miles in slightly over 190 days. The San Francisco Chronicle of September 11, 1886 reported that, "He had no hair-breath escapes by flood or field beyond having to be ferried across a piece of flooded roadway near Mobile, and getting badly scared in Arizona by sighting a band of Mexicans whom he mistook for Apaches on the warpath. He followed the route of the Southern Pacific Railroad for the most part. During the trip he wore out six pairs of trousers, five pairs of shoes, a couple of coats, and two hats." The Daily Alta California of September 10, 1886 added, "The gentleman looked pretty rough in his old clothes with his knapsack and canteens strapped on, but he was feeling good. He was introduced to the audience (at a bicycle race) who gave him many hearty cheers and much applause. Afterwards in company with Captain O'Callahan and T. L. Hill, the traveler took a jaunt around the course." A bountiful feast followed the track appearance. The Los Angles Express of August 29, 1886 also gave an account of his ride and stated that he was 20 years old and weighed 135 pounds when he began his ride.
There are only scattered accounts of his life after his 1886 journey. It was reported that he planned a long two-year return journey with his brother Frank and a friend from New York, C. W. Listman. He probably returned by train since there is no evidence that this trip materialized. The Wheel of August 12, 1887 reported that Van Meerbeke planned to reside in Patterson, New Jersey and work in a silk mill. On June 29, 1888 the New York Times noted that Van Meerbeke had embarked on an extended bicycle tour in Pennsylvania and adjacent areas of New York State.
Apparently Van Meerbeke did not want publicity, for other than a few newspaper reports like the ones cited above, there is no known account of his bicycle trips. Karl Kron (p. xcvii) tells us that he sent three letters to Van Meerbeke seeking information about the transcontinental ride, but received no response.

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Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: USA
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Motorbike-moped, Motocicletta-motorino, Moto-cyclomoteur
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: USA
Internet: http://www.vanburensisters.com
Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q7913220

The sisters descended from Martin Van Buren, the eighth President of the United States. In 1916, 24-year-old Augusta and 22-year-old Adeline Van Buren, or Gussie and Addie as they were known, were in their 20s and active in the national Preparedness Movement. America was about to enter World War I, and the sisters wanted to prove that women could ride as well as men and would be able to serve as military dispatch riders, freeing up men for other tasks.[4] They also hoped to remove one of the primary arguments for denying women the right to vote. For their ride, they dressed in military-style leggings and leather riding breeches, a taboo at that time.
They set out from Sheepshead Bay racetrack in Brooklyn, New York on July 4, riding 1,000 cc Indian Power Plus motorcycles equipped with gas headlights. Indians were the high-end motorcycle at the time, selling for $275, and ran Firestone "non-skid" tires.
They arrived in Los Angeles on September 8 after having to contend with poor roads, heavy rains and mud, natural barriers like the Rocky Mountains, and social barriers such as the local police who took offence at their choice of men's clothing. During the ride, they were arrested numerous times, not for speeding but for wearing men's clothes. In Colorado, they became the first women to reach the 14,109-foot summit of Pikes Peak by any motor vehicle. Later on, they became lost in the desert 100 miles west of Salt Lake City and were saved by a prospector after their water ran out. They completed their ride by traveling across the border to Tijuana in Mexico.
"Beyond question the Van Burens have made one of the most noteworthy trips ever accomplished, chiefly because they have proven that the motorcycle is a universal vehicle."[citation needed] —Paul Derkum, Indian Motorcycle Company
Despite succeeding in their trek, the sisters' applications to be military dispatch riders were rejected. Reports in the leading motorcycling magazine of the day praised the bike but not the sisters and described the journey as a "vacation".  One newspaper published a degrading article accusing the sisters of using the national preparedness issue as an excellent excuse to escape their roles as housewives and "display their feminine counters in nifty khaki and leather uniforms".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Buren_sisters

 

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Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: France-Francia
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Various-Diversi-Différents
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Artic-Artico
Internet: http://www.nicolasvanier.com
Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q1375042
Additional references-Riferimenti complementari-Références complémentaires: Vanier N., L’odissea bianca : l’avventura di un uomo e dei suoi cani nel Grande Nord canadese, RCS Rizzoli Libri, 2001.
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Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: Belgium, Belgio, Belgique
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: On foot-A piedi-A pied
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
Inscriptions-Iscrizioni-Inscriptions: Le tour du monde en brouette par deux Belges
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Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: France-Francia
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Motorbike-moped, Motocicletta-motorino, Moto-cyclomoteur
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
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Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: -
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: On foot-A piedi-A pied
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
Inscriptions-Iscrizioni-Inscriptions: Sans argent, je fais le tour du monde à pied, s.v.p. achetez une carte. Parti La Haye 1922-1930, 60.000 kilomètres. A parcouru 39.000 kilomètres par lesquelles nous avons perdu un ami fidèle par les fièvres malaria, qui mourut le 4 mai 1924 à Langenburg, Est-Afrique
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Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: The Fat Man Walking
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: USA
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: On foot-A piedi-A pied
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: USA
Internet: https://thefatmanwalking.com

'Fat Man Walking': Journey 'profoundly changed me'

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Steve Vaught, the self-proclaimed "Fat Man Walking," arrived in New York on Tuesday after a nearly 3,000-mile walk across the country to lose weight and find happiness.

When he left Oceanside, California, about 13 months ago, he weighed 410 pounds. Vaught, 40, was suffering from depression that had worsened over the years since he killed two pedestrians in a car accident when he was 25.

He ended the journey about 100 pounds lighter. Vaught spoke with CNN's Soledad O'Brien on Wednesday.

O'BRIEN: How was it to cross over the [George Washington] bridge and finally make it?

VAUGHT: It was pretty exciting. It was kind of funny.

You know, it started to rain a little bit. And the media were following me around and running into poles and tripping over one another. And I thought -- I go 3,000 miles and then I get a bunch of people hurt at the end.

O'BRIEN: Oh, don't worry about the media. They always run into poles.

You began last year, as we all know because we've been following your story and telling your story. You weighed 410 pounds. Give me a little background as to why -- why you decided to take on a trek across the country.

VAUGHT: Well, for me, I had to figure out some way to conquer the problems that created the weight. I knew that it wasn't an issue of just losing the weight, because people do that all the time.

O'BRIEN: So it was more mental than, sort-of like, I'm going to walk across the country and lose some weight?

VAUGHT: Yes. It started out a little more basic, and exactly that. You know, I was thinking that if I walked across the country I'd lose weight and I'd be happy. And I learned along the way that you have to be happy first and then the weight just goes naturally as you start to, you know, not rely on food as comfort.

And that's what I needed to do. I needed to make a drastic change in my life, and that sometimes takes drastic steps.

O'BRIEN: You gained some weight toward the end. And I'm curious to know, because, of course, when you walk along the highway, what you really have as choices to eat, it's kind of junk food.

VAUGHT: It is. It's mostly junk food, in fact. Mostly fried, you know, battered, gravy. It's not...

O'BRIEN: It's good, but it's bad for you.

VAUGHT: It's good. Well, that's why they sell it, because people buy it. And -- but it's not that good for you.

But in the end, I sort of started to not even follow my own direction, and I got a little over zealous. And I was eating probably 80 percent protein, 20 percent carbohydrate, and I actually made myself kind of sick. So, on doctor's orders I had to switch up a little bit, and I put on about 10 or 12 pounds.

O'BRIEN: You wanted to quit a couple of times, I read.

VAUGHT: Yesterday I wanted to quit a couple of times.

O'BRIEN: Yesterday? You're like this close.

VAUGHT: Every day. No, every day you wake up, and even if you're, you know, that close, you still say, oh, 10, 15 more miles? But that's where the lesson is. The lesson is in overcoming the hardship, overcoming the adversity.

So, the point is, every day you want to quit, but you don't. You understand that you still have to go. So you feel sorry for yourself for a little bit, and then you say, OK, now I have to go.

O'BRIEN: I've got to ask you about some of that adversity, as we've been talking about. When you were 25 years old you were in a car accident.

VAUGHT: Right.

O'BRIEN: You took the life of two elderly pedestrians. It was an accident. You couldn't see them.

VAUGHT: No, I didn't see them.

O'BRIEN: And how much of that played a role in sort of exorcising the demons, maybe, in this walk?

VAUGHT: You know, the -- when the accident occurred, the change was so gradual I didn't notice it for quite a while. But it actually changed my life completely, and it really -- it made me very depressed, and that makes your world close up. And I started to gain weight, and it became even smaller.

And by the time I got to the point where I was going to go on the walk, I was really -- you know, my outlook was very, very dim. And being on this walk, I've just learned so much and I've met so many great people and changed so much that it's just profoundly changed me, I think, for the rest of my life.

O'BRIEN: You've got two kids. They're 4 and 9.

VAUGHT: That's correct.

O'BRIEN: And a wife as well. I know you guys had a little bit of trouble along the way.

VAUGHT: Right.

O'BRIEN: And I think I read that you're -- she's filing for divorce.

VAUGHT: Right.

O'BRIEN: But you're still good friends.

VAUGHT: We are.

O'BRIEN: The family's not here?

VAUGHT: No. It was going to be too expensive to bring them out. We really wanted to, but, no, it just didn't work out.

O'BRIEN: New York City is such a rip-off. It's all expensive -- please. I could have told you that when you were back in Ohio or something.

O'BRIEN: ... what do you think the lesson is for the kids and the family?

VAUGHT: Never give up. My daughter took a phrase that I told her. I don't even remember when I told her, but she was asking me about learning to fly. She wants to fly without the aid of an aircraft.

O'BRIEN: God bless her.

VAUGHT: She wants to physically fly. And she told me that she didn't think it was impossible. And I told her nothing's impossible. It just hasn't been figured out yet. And that's the thing that she keeps reminding me, especially at the low points.

She's sort of become a bit of a coach. And, you know, the fact that she's so proud and she's so, you know, strongly behind me, it really helped me keep going.

O'BRIEN: That's cool. That's great.

VAUGHT: They've been very much a part of this. Even though April and I have had our troubles, we're still parents, and we love our kids. And we're still a family. So they've been a very big part of this.

O'BRIEN: I was told to ask you, are you going to walk back?

VAUGHT: No. I'm not even walking to the hotel. Are you kidding?

O'BRIEN: Maybe the guys will carry you back to the hotel.

VAUGHT: I'm good for walking for a while.

O'BRIEN: Steve Vaught is the self-proclaimed "Fat Man Walking." Nice to see you. Congratulations.

VAUGHT: Thank you.

http://edition.cnn.com/2006/US/05/10/vaught/index.html?_s=PM:US

 

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