Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: USA
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Various-Diversi-Différents
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
Write comment (0 Comments)

Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: USA
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: 1853-1928
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Velocipede-Vélocipède
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: USA
Internet: http://www.thewheelmen.org
Additional references-Riferimenti complementari-Références complémentaires: Thayer G., Pedal and path: Across the continent awheel and afoot, Hartford, Evening Post Association, 1887.

Thayer wrote a series of articles for the Hartford Evening Post describing his round trip journey from Hartford to San Francisco and back. He rode from Hartford to Salt Lake City before taking the train to Lake Tahoe, and then rode the remainder of the way to San Francisco. Thayer carried a bottle of water from the Atlantic, which he poured into the Pacific before returning east, a majority of the way by train.
Mr. Thayer was the consummate bicycle tourist who made a circuitous seven-month pleasure trip of 11,000 miles across the United States and back by wheel, ship, and train. He was not averse to taking freight or passenger trains when tired of riding or afflicted by ailments such as boils. In his book Pedal and Path Across the Continent (p. 79) he tells us, "After six hundred miles through the states of Illinois and Iowa, over the prairies, both level and rolling, I am frank to acknowledge that the prospect of five hundred miles more of the same kind of scenery did not make me over enthusiastic to travel it on my wheel. The object of the trip was not to make or break records, and thus far, whenever I have found it desirable to take a train, I have done so." His short stature that restricted him to riding a small wheel bicycle proved an advantage on the train for he could comfortably nap on the seats. He provides a description of life on the train. "The newsboys on the trains out here are newsmen, full grown men. The one on the train worked steadily all the afternoon with his papers, books, oranges, bananas, etc., and finally when every one was tired of the very sight of him he brought in a basket of toys and sitting down on the arms of the seats, amused the children in the car with snakes and jumping jacks for half an hour or more. Great liberty is allowed passengers traveling such long distances and little boys play leap-frog and perform all sorts of gymnastic exercises in the aisle." (Hartford Evening Post, June 15, 1886)
In Karl Kron's book (xcviii) we are told that Thayer was born of May 13, 1853 in Vernon, Connecticut and that he was engaged in the grocery business until the end of 1885. His love affair with the bicycle began in the early 1870s when he rode boneshakers. He graduated to high wheelers and was quite proficient since he rode 2,500 miles in 1885 with only a few falls.
He began his pleasure trip, at age 33, from Vernon on April 10, 1886 riding a 46" nickel plated Columbia Expert that he became quite fond of by the time he reached California. "And it would be almost ungrateful to the machine now not to say a word in its favor, for I have a feeling of affection towards this particular Expert that is akin to that felt by an equestrian for a strong, able horse that has carried him safely over so much country." (Hartford Evening Post, August 13, 1886)
His Columbia was equipped with a Larkin cyclometer and he wore a corduroy suit with a leather seat. Unlike most riders who carried a satchel attached to the handlebars, Thayer wore a knapsack that weighed about 15 pounds and included some spare parts. His only complaint about this arrangement was the fact that when he took a header the knapsack struck the back of his head.
His ride began by crossing Connecticut to reach the lower Hudson Valley and then north to Albany. He followed the route used by Stevens and Spier to Cleveland and then he went south to Columbus, Ohio and took the National Pike toward Chicago. He crossed Iowa and Nebraska and went a bit south into Colorado before heading for Salt Lake City and then reaching San Francisco by train. There was a great deal of sightseeing en route. He visited Hudson River attractions, was shown Niagara Falls by members of the Buffalo Bicycle Club (they had also hosted Stevens), and viewed President Garfield's (assassinated July 2, 1881) home near Cleveland. Several days were spent in Chicago to visit the stockyards, the parks, and other attractions. He also paid attention to state capitol building along his route, went to the top of Pike's Peak, and saw Lake Tahoe. There were also stops to see relatives or friends. He saw a brother in Grinnell, Iowa, accidentally met Frank Van Meerbeke in Green River, Wyoming Territory, and stayed with Connecticut friends in San Francisco.
When he arrived in San Francisco about July 29, 1886 he was able to fulfill one of his goals as reported in the Hartford Evening Post of August 13, 1886. "The prime motive of the journey was to see the Yosemite and carry that bottle of liquid to California. The cork was not even drawn during the entire journey, and yet that liquid had a wonderful power in keeping my spirits up…Last fall while riding along the rocky shores of Nahant, I filled a small bottle with water from the Atlantic Ocean. To-day I emptied part of that water into the Pacific ocean near the Cliff house and now I have a bottle filled with water taken from the Atlantic and from the Pacific oceans and in the bottom of the bottle are some pebbles and sand, the former from the Atlantic, the latter from the Pacific."
After visiting the sights in California, Thayer traveled by ship to Portland, Oregon. His return to the East began from that point and he went through Idaho, Salt Lake, Denver, and St. Louis to Kentucky, West Virginia and Maryland by bike and train. More stops and sightseeing were done in route. One of the most colorful events was the St. Louis parade in which he participated as an aide to the grand marshall on the cold frosty evening of October 1, 1886. "I rode to the natatorium about dark where the wheelmen had already begun to congregate and it was interesting to witness the transformations in their appearance. One after another came hurriedly in, wearing his ordinary clothes, and disappeared in the numerous dressing rooms in the building. Very soon out would come an immense green frog nearly six feet high, waling on his hind legs, then came a gorilla…soon after a great white rooster came strutting about. Then appeared the devil in red tights…closely following him was 'Cupid' in white tights with nothing to keep him warm but a pair of tiny wings and an eyeglass. Cupid is better known to Hartford wheelmen as George W. Baker, who made the wonderful ride from St. Louis to Boston last year in nineteen and one-half days….The machines were variously and tastefully trimmed with different colored paper and hung with Chinese lanterns. One machine, or rather three bicycles fastened together and supporting a sort of canopy was festooned with nearly a hundred lanterns." (Hartford Evening Post, October 13, 1886)
Thayer arrived back in Connecticut in November, having covered 4236 miles by bicycle and 7000 miles by train. He was employed by the Hartford Evening Post and his weekly articles about the trip that had been published by the paper were incorporated into the book, Pedal and Path Across the Continent that was published in 1887. He and two companions made a 2,600-mile bicycle tour of Great Britain, France, Germany, and Switzerland during the fall of 1888 and the spring of 1889. The Bicycling World correspondent commented (May 18, 1888), "We wish we could join that party. Mr. Thayer is just the sort of a man we should like to tour with." About a decade later Pvt. Thayer served in Company K of the Connecticut Volunteer Infantry during the Spanish-American war. Mr. Thayer died in 1928.

 

Write comment (0 Comments)

Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: -
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: On foot-A piedi-A pied
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
Inscriptions-Iscrizioni-Inscriptions: Tour du monde à pied, record international de la marche, n'ayant pour ressource que la vente de sa carte photographique. Tour du monde en cinq ans, a visité les cinq parties du monde; il ne lui reste plus qu'à parcourir une partie de la France. Avec les contrôles les plus sérieux. Il aura couvert 52'500 kilomètres.
Write comment (0 Comments)

Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: -
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Boat-ship, Barca-nave, Bateau
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
Internet: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_The_World
Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q1495908

MS The World is a residential cruise ship. Unlike other cruise ships, which operate like a resort, it is operated like a condominium complex, with large cabins that can be purchased. The residents, from about 19 countries, live on board as the ship travels. Some residents choose to live on board full-time while others visit periodically throughout the year.[1] The ship is operated by ROW Management, Ltd., headquartered in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States.[2]

The ship has 165 residences (106 apartments, 19 studio apartments, and 40 studios), all owned by the ship's residents. Average occupancy is 150–200 residents and guests.

The World is registered in The Bahamas and has a gross tonnage of 43,188. It is 196.35 metres (644 ft 2 in) long, 29.8 metres (98 ft) wide, and has a 6.7-metre (22 ft) draft, 12 decks, and a maximum speed of 18.5 knots (34.3 km/h; 21.3 mph). The crew numbers approximately 280.

As of 28 January 2017 The World holds the world record for the southernmost ship voyage. The record was broken by her Captain Dag H. Sævik, and the 63 residents on board at the time as well as crewmembers. The ship reached 78°43•997´S and 163°41•421´W at the Bay of Whales in Antarctica’s Ross Sea.[3]

In March 2020 the ship was emptied of passengers and non-essential crew because of concerns about the COVID-19 pandemic.[4] As of 21 September 2020, a date for when the ship will resume service has not been announced.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_The_World 

Write comment (0 Comments)

Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: The range raiders
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: USA
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: On horseback-A cavallo-A cheval
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: USA
Inscriptions-Iscrizioni-Inscriptions: The range raiders on the trail from Sunvalley, Idaho, to New York World's Fair. The Skipper, the famous overland bull, silver Sally
Write comment (0 Comments)

Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: -
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Velocipede-Vélocipède
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: -
Internet: http://www.thewheelmen.org/sections/americanjourneys/shiningsea/gray.asp

Until recently little information was available on Gray. It is now known, however, that he was born in the farm hamlet of East Springfield, New York, located about 50 miles west of Albany on the Western Turnpike. Members of the Gray family were prosperous farmers who had been in the Cooperstown region since shortly after the Revolution. In 1858 a Daniel Gray married Dorothy Springer and they became the parents of three sons: Martin born in 1861, Charles Theron (later called Theron or C. T. Gray) born in 1863, and George born in 1870. It is not known if Martin was a cyclist, but Theron was riding a Columbia by the mid 1880s and George had a 52" Victor by the end of that decade. Theron may have been a member of the Pioneer Bicycle Club in Cooperstown that was 10 miles south or he may have gravitated to the wheelmen circle found in Herkimer that was 20 miles north. He probably knew riders in both communities.
He left East Springfield in late May 1887 and went to New York City where his transcontinental ride began on June 1. He proceeded to Boston, perhaps in recognition that Stevens had ended his ride in that city. He then left for Chicago and he must have made considerable use of the train for he arrived in Porkopolis on June 8th.
A postcard mailed home to his grandmother Springer on that date read, "Hello E.S, I'm all right. Do not hear from you, hope you are all well and taking your rations…It looks pleasant this morn, quite warm. Was riding some yesterday in the parks. Cyclometer showed 40 miles. NN (Hadley) and I are going out for a trip today, going to run out of the city. Nellis hasn't arrived yet. (?) have probably held him back. Wishing you all good health and luck. I am yours, Theron." This was an interesting message for it indicates that Theron had met Mr. Hadley when he had ridden through the Mohawk Valley on a trip from Vermont to Chicago. It also suggests that Gray had probably hurried to Chicago to meet George Nellis so that they could discuss the possibility of riding together. It isn't clear why this matter wasn't worked out well in advance or why Gray didn't leave Herkimer with Nellis on May 24th.
The two men did meet in Chicago on June 11th and they rode out of the City together on June 13th. They soon separated, however, for Nellis wanted to travel at a fast pace to establish a record time and Gray was interested in a more leisurely sightseeing trip. Gray followed the normal route through Iowa and into Nebraska where he began to bear southwest toward Kansas. He mailed another postcard, dated June 29, from South Bend, Nebraska, which said, "Arrived here at 6. Started from Omaha at 9 - only 35 miles today. Bound for Lincoln, Red Cloud, Hoxie, or Kenneth, Kansas. Crossed the Platte river bridge mile long. Feel better out of city, roads not very good today. Write me at Hoxie, Sheridan County, Kansas. Am feeling good, eat much. Theron." It is nice to imagine that young Willa Cather may have looked out of the window of her Red Cloud home and watched Theron ride past.
Gray passed through a corner of Kansas and entered Colorado so that he could visit Pike's Peak, Denver, and Hot Springs. He then traveled northwest to reach the Union Pacific line in Wyoming Territory. A card was mailed home from Rock Springs, Wyoming Territory that indicated he was well and thinking of home, "would like to be there now to go to Cromhorn with you." (The Crumhorn Mountain House was a small resort in the hills of Otsego County)
He followed the tradition of previous wheelmen by making a detour from the railroad at Ogden to visit Salt Lake City where he spent a few days investigating the Mormons. Gray and other wheelmen disliked crossing Nevada. According to the San Francisco Evening Bulletin of October 14, 1887, he, "found the worst roads met with on the trip, the sand in many places being so deep that for miles at a time he was obliged to dismount and push the bicycle before him." His September 20 postcard from Lovelocks, Nevada said, "Here I am, been working half an hour to get cleaned up. Managed to get some of the dust off. Tis very dusty traveling on these roads. No rain since spring."
Gray followed the Central Pacific route through the Sierras and had an uneventful trip through California to arrive in San Francisco. The newspaper article cited above stated, "On October 11th he arrived in this city, and after resting for a day or two, made a trip to the Big Trees, proceeded by boat and rail to Milton, and there taking to his bicycle. On his return he rode as far as Stockton, and then took the boat back to the city." He then went south to Glendora, west of Los Angles near the San Gabriel Valley, to visit a friend or relative named Frank. The two young men rode bicycles and visited the local fruit groves.
Gray soon departed, however, on the Southern Pacific Railroad for New Orleans. His last surviving postcard was mailed from a train stop at Winslow, Arizona. "Dear Friends, 23 minutes for supper. Rode all day. This fore noon thru canyons, rocks, timber. At about 2 PM emerged out again in the desert plain. Has been cloudy most all day. Have lots of time for meditation. Get birds eye of country as go skipping along. Am over thousand miles from San Francisco. Expect to be in Orleans Friday and maybe Thursday. Yours with love, Theron."
Gray was back in East Springfield by the end of October 1887. He married the next year and owned a fine farm. A daughter Mabel was born in 1890 and a son Harold arrived in 1893. An old damaged photograph from 1891 shows Gray resting against a tree in front of his handsome home holding Mabel. His wife Ella is standing nearby and appears to be holding a pie. Leaning against a wall in the corner of the photo is another object of pride, his high wheel bicycle. Gray died in 1931.
There is no known record of the ride other than what is recorded in seven postcards and three short newspaper articles.

http://www.thewheelmen.org/sections/americanjourneys/shiningsea/gray.asp

 

Write comment (0 Comments)

Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: -
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Bike, tricycle-Bicicletta, triciclo-Vélo, tricycle
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Europe-Europa
Inscriptions-Iscrizioni-Inscriptions: Tour de France et de Belgique par deux mutilés du travail, sur cet appareil original, tournant dans tous les sens et se pilotant par des moyens trompant les lois de la mécanique. Cet appareil a été conçu et construit entièrement par eux.
Write comment (0 Comments)

Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: USA
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: On foot-A piedi-A pied
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: USA
Inscriptions-Iscrizioni-Inscriptions: Mr. and Mrs Robt. L. Thomas, walking from Columbus - O. to San Francisco
Write comment (0 Comments)

Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: -
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: -
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
Wikidata: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q2266390
Additional references-Riferimenti complementari-Références complémentaires: Alexandre Poussin, Sylvain Tesson. On a roulé sur la terre. Paris: Pocket, 2008.

L'année 1994 est l'occasion d'un tour du monde en vélo pour les écrivains Alexandre Poussin et Sylvain Tesson: un an, 25'000 km, 35 pays. Une expérience traduite avec la publication de On a roulé sur la Terre. En 1997, ils traversent l'Himalaya et reviennent avec un second récit La marche dans le ciel. Pendant deux ans il co-présentent le magazine Montagne sur France 3.

Write comment (0 Comments)

Alias-Pseudonimo-Pseudonyme: -
Nationality-Nazionalità-Nationalité: 1850 - 1906
Birth/death-Nascita/morte-Naissance/mort: -
Means of transport-Mezzo di trasporto-Moyen de transport: Various-Diversi-Différents
Geographical description-Riferimento geografico-Référence géographique: Around the World-Giro del mondo-Tour du monde
Internet: https://archive.org/details/intrackofsunread00thom
Additional references-Riferimenti complementari-Références complémentaires: Thompson, Frederick Diodati, e Harry Fenn. In the Track of the Sun; Readings from the Diary of a Globe Trotter. New York: D. Appleton, 1893.

 

Mr. Thompson left New York for Chicago on October 14th, 1891, and returned to that city on May 18th in the following year. This handsome volume records by pen and pencil what he saw and thought of lands, seas, men, and cities during that time. He began by going across the Continent to Victoria, British Columbia ; went thence to Vancouver, and from Vancouver sailed to Japan. Japan seems to have exercised on him its customary fascination. China did not please him as much. (Why, we may ask, the very hideous picture of "After the Execu- tion " ?) India occupied, of course, some time,—including the stay in Ceylon (where he saw Arabi Pasha), more than a fifth of the time given to the whole of his globe-trotting ; Egypt, Pales- tine, and Europe followed, with ten days in this country. There is nothing remarkable about Mr. Thompson's experiences and opinions ; but the volume in which he has recorded them is excel- lently got up. (We believe that the statement on p. 136 about the behaviour of the Indian rebels to their prisoners is not correct.)
The Spectator, 02.06.1894

Write comment (0 Comments)