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Jebb, Louisa. By Desert Ways to Baghdad and Damascus. London: T. F. Unwin, 1909.

Description

Every age witnesses the birth of some great soul. Sometimes events bring these people to the attention of the world. More often than not, they alter the lives around them, then pass on quietly. Such a soul belonged to the author of this cherished book. There was nothing in Louisa Jebb’s comfortable Victorian youth to indicate she would one day take to the saddle and pen one of the most eloquent equestrian travel books ever written. Yet in the early years of the 20th century, Jebb set out with a female companion to cross the Turkish Empire on horseback. To say they were unprepared to become Long Riders would be an understatement. Neither of them could speak the local language. Furthermore, both wore cumbersome full-length skirts and rode side-saddles. They were, in a word, enthusiastic amateurs who believed courage and common sense would see them through. Remarkably, it did. Having hired a picturesque guide and reliable horses, they set out to explore the secret corners of the Sultan’s empire. What they discovered were guarded harems and regal Pashas, fabled rivers and a desert world of intense beauty. If Jebb rode into Turkey expecting to find adventure, she found it. Yet she discovered something else – nomadic freedom. It is her personal observations about this subject that set “By Desert Ways to Baghdad and Damascus” apart from other equestrian travel books. “In the untravelled parts of the East you reign supreme, there is no need to go about securely chained to a gold watch. Ignore Time, and he is your servant,” she observed wisely. Sadly, revolution and death soon swept across this fabled land, wiping away the kingdom of the Turkish Caliphs and laying the foundations for the grief which enshrouds this unhappy part of the world today. Upon her return to “civilization” the author lamented about what she had found, then lost. “Last night we were dirty, isolated and free, tonight we are clean, sociable and trammelled. Last night the setting sun’s final message was burnt into us. Tonight the sunset passed unheeded as we sit imprisoned and oppressed by the confining walls of Damascus Palace Hotel. We are no longer princesses whose hands are kissed. We are now judged by the cost of our raiment.” Few books contain as many great abiding truths as this one does.

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Weston, Edward Payson. The Pedestrian: Being a Correct Journal of “Incidents” on a Walk from the State House, Boston, Mass., to the U.S. Capitol, at Washington, D.C., Performed in “Ten Consecutive Days,” between February 22d and March 4th, 1861. New York: Printed for E.P. Weston, 1862.

Description

As I am daily asked the question, what possessed me to make such an attempt as to walk from Boston to "Washington in ten consecutive days—at a time, too, when the condition of the roads was such as to render the walking very difficult— can think of no better way to answer this question, and others respecting this pedestrian performance, than by publishing this journal ; inasmuch as it is my intention to make the at- tempt again in May of the present year. I have also added to this, the account of my adventures, while " walking" from Philadelphia to Washington in disguise, a few days after the riot at Baltimore (19th of April, 1861), and my arrest by the Sixty-ninth regiment of New York State Militia, Colonel Mi- chael Corcoran. You will also find the particulars of my plans for the walk I contemplate taking in May next.

Tlie journal of my walk of "ten days" is compiled from notes taken by my companions on that excursion, Mr. Charles II. Foster, of Worcester, Massachusetts, and Mr. Abner A. Smith, of New Haven, Connecticut.

Having agreed that, were I not successful the first time, I would attempt it again, I am only too willing to do so. I trust you will overlook the many imperfections you will find in these pages, believing that the author can walk better than he can lorite.

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Anger, Benjamin. Notes de voyage d’un globe-trotter, par le Dr Benj. Anger. Lille: impr. de L. Danel, 1890.

Description

À mon retour de voyage, M. E. Marbeau, directeur de la Revue Française de l'Étranger

et des Colonies me pria de lui confier mes notes qui furent imprimées par ses soins. Elles furent l'objet d'appréciations bienveillantes de quelques critiques et en particulier de M. Aug. Marcade qui voulut bien en publier des extraits dans ses articles de quinzaine au Figaro, ce dont je lui suis très reconnaissant. Dispersées dans une dizaine de numéros de la Revue Française , la lecture en était difficile et c'est pour la rendre plus aisée que j'ai réuni les articles déjà publiés, dans ce modeste volume: Notes de voyage d'un Globe-Trotter.

Le nom anglais de Globe-Trotter a été adopté pour designer les touristes assez nombreux aujourd'hui qui font sans pretention le voyage assez facile aujourd'hui

du tour du monde. Un certain nombre de ces voyageurs ont donné d'intéressantes relations de leur voyage.

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Thayer, George B. Pedal and Path: Across the Continent Awheel and Afoot. Hartford: Evening Post Association, 1887.

Description

An account of his journey across America by a member of the Connecticut Bicycle Club published in book form in 1887, having previously appeared in a shorter form as a series of letters in the Hartford Evening Post during the trip itself.

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Bird, Isabella. The Englishwoman in America, 1856.

Description

In 1856, Isabella Bird published The Englishwoman in America, the first of what would be many books of her travels around the world. Adopting a tone of aloof bemusement, she describes in detail the hardships and annoyances of her travels by sea from England to Halifax, and on the road to Boston, Cincinnati, and Chicago. The book's 20 chapters are full of keenly observed and entertainingly told stories of pickpockets and luggage thieves, greasy hotels, and Americans who are very polite, but have the unfortunate habit of spitting on the floor. Bird admits to sharing the regrettably prejudiced view the English have of America, but nevertheless finds much to like and admire in this new country bustling with ethnically diverse immigrants full of energy and bravado. The Englishwoman in America is a wonderful travelogue that offers a lively and personal glimpse into mid-nineteenth-century America. 

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Stevenson, Robert Louis. The Amateur Emigrant. Chicago: Stone and Kimball, 1895.

Description

The Amateur Emigrant (in full: The Amateur Emigrant from the Clyde to Sandy Hook) is Robert Louis Stevenson's travel memoir of his journey from Scotland to California in 1879-1880. It is not a complete account, covering the first third, by ship from Europe to New York City. The middle leg of the trip is documented in Across the Plains (1892) with the final part covered in The Silverado Squatters (1883). The Amateur Emigrant was written in 1879-80 and was not published in full until 1895, one year after his death.

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Woolf, Dwight Homer, and Woolf. Tramping and Camping. Kansas City, Kan.: S. I. Meseraull & Son, Printers, 1912.

Description

The unique experience of Mr. and Mrs. Dwight H. Woolf, the champion Long Distance Walkers, has awakened general interest throughout the United States. 

In 1909, Mr. Woolf's doctor informed him that he would have to get out in the open and stay there, or he would die. He weighed only 107 pounds, including clothes, and was growing weaker daily. Yet he hesitated about giving up his business as a music publisher - his life work; and it seemed a little short of madness to forego all the luxuries - the so-called "comforts" - of civilization 

But Mrs. Woolf, who was a brave, sensible woman, thoroughly devoted to her husband's interests, agreed with the physician and suggested a walk to the Ozark Mountains. 

That was the beginning of a most remarkable series of trips through Missouri, Kansas, Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and up through the north Atlantic States to New York and Boston, then home to Kansas City - in the aggregate, a journey of about 10,300 miles. 

Yet, wherever the couple went there was really but one destination - health. 

Mr. Woolf gained strength and, not long after starting, was able to make twenty-five or thirty miles in a day.

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Page 4 of 5

Giramondo, Globetrotters, Globetrotteurs

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